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Your online identity sells for exactly $ 1,170 on the dark web — here is the block of the sale

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Your personal data leaked to the dark internet: What you need to know

Tricks to protect your personal information, so it is not on the dark web.

What is the asking price for your online identity? Now we finally know.

The harvest of a few of your credit cards, your social security number, your billing address, and even the names of your children now has an exact price tag almost like an Amazon shopping list. According to a new study of Privacy are Central, it is exactly $ 1,170 on the dark web.

As an auction site or Craigslist, the Dark Web is a paradise for hackers.

Netflix accounts, an Uber logging, and access to your AirBnB references cheap — $10 per piece. And, how is it with your Gmail login? That sells for about a dollar. How is it with your iTunes account info? That is exactly $ 15.38. PayPal account? $247.

YOUR PERSONAL DATA MAY BE ON THE DARK WEB: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

All of these logins, credit card numbers, account details are for sale, but security experts recommend that the laundry list of items for sale is only going to grow — and more affordable.

Daniel Smith, a security researcher at Radware, says dark web hackers tend to offer a total package, maybe your mother’s maiden name as a bonus. The offers are becoming more and more sophisticated, and the prices are driven by recent data breaches.

“Accounts for paid streaming services are almost always available in a darknet market,” he said. “Credit cards usually sell between $5 and $20 per card, depending on the value of the card. In large databases go up for sale on the darknet, records fall to less than a dollar a piece.”

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“We have seen the prices as low as $100 for two credit cards and even $350 for ten cards,” added Mounir Hahad, the Head of Threat Research at Juniper Networks. “We have also seen $10 for a keylogger malware, which will to passwords from any computer you have access to – $40 can often get you access to the social media accounts of anyone you are interested in.”

The question is: how can you protect yourself?

Smith says one of the main ways hackers steal your identity these days is through phishing, which is disturbing ploys that trick you into giving bank details, logins, and your social security number. The e-mails look legitimate, as if Bank of America and Wells Fargo actually a computer fault and you need to fill out an online form.

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His advice? Never respond to e-mails that implausible, since 93 percent of phishing scam intended to steal your personally identifiable information. The freeze or close all accounts that you do not use to report fraudulent activities to the bank and to the FTC, and stay vigilant all the help.

“Always make sure the company that you do business,” Smith said. “In the end, if you suspect that you are a victim of fraud, report it to the authorities immediately.”

At the same time, this begins to look grim, said Chris Roberts, the chief security architect at Acalvio. Even the most advanced security measures don’t seem to stop hackers.

“There’s not much consumers can do,” he said. “The police don’t have time, the FBI doesn’t care unless it is a lot of money or children are involved and they are overwhelmed. The best thing you can do is to credit freeze and a hold on things and hold on to. This is worse.”

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