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X-ray of mama’s belly reveals IUD that ‘attacked’ a decade earlier: report

Melinda Nichols, who had opted for an IUD in 2007, after the birth of her youngest child, told The New York Post that she went for a follow-up appointment with her doctor could not find it.
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An Ohio mother who went in for an X-ray after injuring her back and was shocked to discover that the scan picked up an intra-uterine contraceptive device (IUD) floating in her belly that her doctor reportedly claimed had fallen from more than a decade earlier. Melinda Nichols, who had opted for an IUD in 2007, after the birth of her youngest child, told The New York Post that she went for a follow-up appointment after it was implanted, her doctor could not find it.

“It fell out,” Nichols, now 40, claims the doctor told her.

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When would they demand or they would have seen the fall, she claims that the doctor to her that it sometimes happens without the patient noticing.

Iuds are T-shaped device that a health care provider places in a woman’s womb and remains a popular birth control option for patients in the U.S. A possible complication in patients opt for an IUD is expulsion when the device is moved from the intended position at the top of the uterus. According to the Comprehensive Women’s Health Center, this happens in 2-3% of women with an IUD can lead to cramping.

Perforation is another rare complication, the IUD pushes through, or in the muscle of the uterus and occurs in 1-2 per 1000 insertions. In a small percentage of the cases, the device can pass through the uterine wall and migrate to the pelvis, abdominal cavity, gastrointestinal tract and of the bladder, in which the surgical removal.

But Nichols claims her doctor had convinced her that it just fell out, and instead of choosing for a second IUD, Nichols underwent a tubal ligation, commonly referred to as getting your tubes are connected with each other. According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, the procedure is a permanent birth control that blocks or cuts the fallopian tubes. Women who undergo the procedure will still experience periods, but it prevents the egg from travelling from the fallopian tube to the uterus.

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Nichols told the Post that the next ten years she had intermittent pain in her side, but never anything important enough to make a trip to the doctor.

But in November, she had an X-ray for her injury and made the shocking discovery that the device is floating in her abdominal cavity.

“I had no idea,” she told The Post. “For me, it was almost 11 years.”

She said that she hopes her shocking discovery resonates with women and helps them to their doctors for the answers.

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“Make sure that if you have something like this, that you check it out,” she told The Post. “As they say, it fell out, make sure they know it fell out.”

Nichols posted the photo of her X-ray on Facebook, where they shared an additional 51,000 times and received over 4,400 responses.

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