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United CEO Oscar Munoz, says employee was more concerned with the plane schedule than passenger’s heart attack

Oscar Munoz said the company reorganized its priorities in the wake of the public passenger-related incidents.

(Reuters)

United CEO Oscar Munoz says the airline in boosting the efforts to improve customer service — but in doing so, he showed how backward the company’s priorities used to be.

During the talk on Monday, Society for Human resource Management (SHRM) conference in Chicago, Munoz claimed that the carrier’s strict rules and the efficiency of protocols by the workers, and the priority of the policy in respect of customer care, which ever led to a disturbing incident with a gate agent and a sick passenger, Quartz reported.

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According to Munoz, a frustrated gate agent told him that a passenger once hit by a heart attack while waiting to board a flight, and when he reported to a zone controller, whose job it is to ensure flights left on time — the controller is more concerned about the aircraft departs on time.

“That, ladies and gentlemen, it was not a caring thought,” he said of the zone controller priorities.

Munoz also claimed that, for the gate agent, this particular incident left him with feelings of apathy towards his job.

“We let rules and procedures get in the way of our people,” Munoz mentioned.

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Munoz added that, in the United had actually reorganized its “core” four priorities after the airline a lot of publicity dragging incident in April 2017, in order of importance: “Care” now follows “safety” as the airline priority, followed by efficiency and reliability, Quartz reported.

Munoz said that the results of the airline’s new policies will need to be observed in time.

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The following 2017 dragging incident, in which passenger David Dao was under the compulsion of a United flight to Kansas City, and bloodied in the process, United also announced a number of changes in the policy, including up to $10,000 incentive for voluntarily bumped passengers on oversold flights.

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