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Two-third of the country’s birds are threatened with extinction, a new report claims

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Nearly two-thirds of America’s breeding bird species are in danger of extinction, in the midst of global warming, according to a new report.

Scientists are very close to the airport, used the 140 million observations recorded by birders and scientists, to pinpoint where the 604 a North American species of birds present in a region referred to as the “range.” Next, they used the latest climate models project to find out how each and every species’ range would be a shift away from climate change and other human impacts in advance of the whole of the continent as a whole.

In their report, which concludes that out of 604 species have been modeled, 389, are vulnerable to extinction, which means that as soon as the 2080, and more than one-half of their current range, it may become uninhabitable — and they would not gain new ground.

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A red-bellied woodpecker perches on a tree in a garden in Quincy, MA on May 7, 2019. (Photo by Matthew J. Lee/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

“Ninety-nine percent of the birds would be able to cope with more frequent extreme weather events such as intense spring heat, and heavy rainfall; at the same time, the increase in the level of the sea, and of urbanization, could be consuming much-needed habitat,” the scientists write in a summary of their findings. Most of the birds you are likely to multiple, multiple threats and unless we curb the emissions, and the priority of the preservation of the areas identified by the models, which will be a crucial year for the climate-threatened birds.”

The models that have been used, which is said to be the culmination of five years of research, the “cutting edge,” said Josh Lawler, an ecologist at the University of Washington in Seattle, who are using similar models to predict how wildlife might respond to climate change, he was not involved in the Audobon study.

Audobon report to be released in 2014, to say that one-half of the land, the birds are vulnerable to climate change. This new report looks at each of the bird’s biology, in contrast to the old report.

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An adult whooping crane at the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland, usa in 2017. (Photo by Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

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