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Tokyo Olympic games of 2020 to be used for face recognition in safety first

NEC Green Rockets’ rugby player Teruya Goto poses with the face recognition system for Tokyo 2020 the Olympic games and the Paralympic games, which has been developed by NEC corp, during the demonstration in Tokyo, Japan, August 7, 2018.

(Reuters)

Tokyo 2020 will be the first Olympic games in the implementation of facial recognition technology to increase safety, to all locations, organizers announced on Tuesday.

Reuters reports that the organizers of the Olympic games, along with NEC, a Japanese telecommunications and information technology company, developing the first system of this type can be applied to the global sporting event.

The technology was demonstrated for the media at an event this week in Tokyo and will make use of IC chips in identification cards for automatically verifying the identity of those who have more than 40 locations, according to the wire service.

To facilitate the implementation of the technology, more than 300,000 athletes and Games staff should be the pictures to create a database before the Olympics begin in July 2020.

NEC Red Rockets’ volleyball player Haruyo Shimamura shows the face recognition system for Tokyo 2020 the Olympic games and the Paralympic games, which has been developed by NEC corp., in Tokyo, Japan, August 7, 2018.

(Reuters)

“Every time that they are in the facility, they have to make with a security check,” Tokyo 2020, the head of the security service of Tsuyoshi Iwashita explained.

The face recognition system will not, however, focus on the spectators.

“Tokyo locations do not always have enough space for the security check or even space to wait for the security check. When the events happen, we expect a lot of people come and the weather will be very hot. This is the reason why we introduced this face recognition,” Iwashita added.

The technology was reportedly tested during the Olympic games of 2016 in Rio de janeiro.

“99.7 percent of the time, the face is recognized by the system correctly,” said NEC vice-president Masaaki Suanuma.

Christopher Carbone is a reporter and news editor covering science and technology for FoxNews.com. He can be reached at christopher.carbone@foxnews.com. Follow him on Twitter @christocarbone.

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