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Thousands of lawsuits have been examined in the Ohio, after a former judge, reportedly showed up to work drunk

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The more than 2,700 lawsuits are dealt with by the former, southern Ohio, and a judge may be re-examined after a judge in the family accused him of repeatedly coming to work drunk.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reported that the state prosecutor’s office, the office of oversight and review of all of 2,707 cases for the Scioto County common pleas court Judge William T. Marshall, 62, who is in prison, a period of time, or other court supervision. At least 1,200 of the things that have allegedly been heard of since Marshall was the first to be admitted to hospital for alcohol in 2013.

As the examiner reported, Marshall’s family filed custody papers in February, and that he’s in control of his or her personal and financial affairs. They argued that Marshall had “reportedly, a number of occasions where he has either failed to appear for work as a common pleas court judge, or come to work while under the influence,” and claimed that ” without a legal guardian, the court would be willing to go back to drinking, and the pursuit of his self-inflicted death sentence.”

The messages of Fox News is seeking comment from Marshall or his attorney were not returned.

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Court documents indicate that Marshall had been admitted to the hospital at least three times since 2013, and was ordered to rehab as part of his penalty for driving under the influence after a motor vehicle accident.

The Former Scioto County Common Pleas Court Judge William Marshall
(Facebook)

“That’s [for 2013], when we have concrete evidence that his drinking was severe enough to seriously interfere with his life and his potential and his ability to make real choices to make from the bench,” Ohio Public Defender Tim Young told the doctor.

Scioto County Prosecutor Shane Tieman, expressed scepticism about the review, he told the Researcher that, “I don’t think it’s going to be many if any cases which are known to have problems. All of it has been written, recorded on video and audio, etc., of course, [Marshall] had a problem, but that’s not going to turn out to be as big a problem as they are.”

In March, the researchers published a study that indicates that Marshall was involved in a sex-trafficking ring based in the southern part of Ohio, and in the city of Portsmouth. The report cites the federal wiretap affidavit for a prominent local lawyer Michael Mearan, who claimed to be Mearan is the promise of his female clients that he would arrange for stringent penalties and new requirements for them from the judges, and parole officers, as long as the women agree to be pimped out.

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In the affidavit, a judge, a number of women to the doctor the Marshall, who acted “in cooperation” with the Mearan and women are on to him. Three different women said they had been approached to have sex with Marshall, or to work as a prostitute for a Mearan.

The court also denied any involvement, she says, “Are you serious? I would never do such a thing.”

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Marshall worked for 16 years at the state bank and, prior to his retirement last year. Several weeks later, the Ohio Supreme Court’s Board of Professional Conduct, are suspended Marshall from the practice of law for six months from the date of the decision “wrong, to face the Ohio State Highway Patrol officers, who had been writing his daughter a speeding ticket.

“I was not a soldier,” Marshall told the county prosecutor’s office, when asked about his behavior, according to The Researchers. “He’s not listening to me. It is used to run a code, in this county, and I am a judge, and he shouldn’t have written about my daughter, ” [the ticket.]”

Click here for more on the Cincinnati Enquirer.

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