News

These 6 tasks can be linked to poor heart health for women

to connectVideoFox News Flash, important news for the month of November. 12

Fox News Flash, important news for the month of November. 12, are here. Check out what to click on Foxnews.com

What to do with female social workers, nurses, and health of the employees, and the retail cashiers, all have in common? According to a new survey, they are likely to have worse heart health than women in other occupations.

In a study of more than 65,000 post-menopausal women, the researchers found that the women who work in the above-mentioned tasks, and were more likely to experience ill-health of the heart.

HATE VEGGIES? GENETICS MAY BE TO BLAME, STUDY SUGGESTS

In particular, the investigators — that is, adjusted for age, race, marital status and education, found that female caregivers had 36% greater risk of having heart-related problems, while female retail cashiers, there were 33% more likely. In the meantime, mental health workers, women’s home health, staff, and all the female nurses were 16 percent more likely to suffer from poor heart health. Female staff nurses (RNs) had a 14 percent higher risk of the same thing, according to a news release from the American Heart Association.

Relatively speaking, the female real estate brokers and salesmen, and were 24 per cent less likely to suffer from poor heart health, while for women, administrative assistants, and were 11 percent less likely to be.

A new study shows that women, social workers, nurses, health assistants and retail cashiers are more likely to have poor heart health in comparison to women who are working other jobs.
(iStock)

The findings will be presented at the American Heart Association’s “Scientific Sessions” event this week-end.

TEXAS COUPLE ON WEDNESDAY IN THE HOSPITAL AFTER THE GROOM’S FATHER IS UNDERGOING EMERGENCY SURGERY

“A few of the professions that had a high risk of poor cardiovascular health were health care professionals, such as nurses and home health staff. This is surprising, since these women are likely to have more knowledge of their cardiovascular risk factors,” said study author’s Request Nriagu, M. B., B. S., M. P. H., is a research fellow in the clinical epidemiology and biostatistics at the Dornsife School of Public Health at Drexel University.

CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE FOX NEWS APP

“We interpret this to mean that it is important to look beyond individual factors such as health knowledge, in order to better understand it in the context of health care, and jobs, which can have a negative impact on the cardiovascular health of women,” he continued, pointing out that the clinician should inquire about their patient’s occupation to help you determine whether or not they are at an increased risk of cardiovascular-related problems.

Follow us

Don't be shy, get in touch. We love meeting interesting people and making new friends.

Most popular