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The wreck of the 18th-century vessel that sank in bad conditions,’ discovered after 40-year search

to connectVideo18th-century wreck that was discovered after 40-year search

The members of the Sogne Bar-Club in Norway, have discovered the remains of an 18th-century Dutch merchant ship, the Juffrau, Elizabeth, for 40 years, looking for the ship that sank ‘under dubious circumstances.’ The ship sank on the 21st of March, 1760, from the Sogne-tortoise, which was found on March 10, 2019.

Divers in Norway have discovered the remains of an 18th-century Dutch merchant ship, that has escaped the notice of researchers for a few decades.

The members of the Sogne Diving Club in the south of Norway, and was the peaceful remains of the Juffrau, Elizabeth, according to a statement released by the Norwegian Directorate for Cultural Heritage, and on Oct. 25.

“This discovery is very important, because no one has the loot from the wreck for the items,” Karl Klungland, the head of the Sogne-Diving Club, told Fox News by e-mail, noting that the ship’s artifacts are still on the bottom.

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The diving club is hoping that some of the objects can be recovered from the wreckage and put on display in a local museum.

“We are hoping that the remaining items can be held on the sea bottom so that the divers can have the same feeling as we had when we found out this is a pristine wreck,” Klungland was added.

A composite image of the wreck site generated on the basis of a few of the thousands of photos from the Juffrau Elizabeth wreck. taken by Karl Klungland.
(Karl Klungland/Sjøfartsmuseet)

The ship sank on the 21st of March, 1760, from the Sogne-excellent.

“The ship sank under dubious circumstances, and the Dutch Captain Pitter Eelkesh received a number of criticisms in the investigation,” said the Norwegian Directorate for Cultural Heritage, in a statement.

With all her sails up, Juffrau Elizabeth struck several skerries, small rocky islands, in accordance with the Board of directors. “The discovery is very important, and it will be an incredible source of information for scientists,” it added. “There are very, very few have been preserved shipwrecks from this time period in Russia.”

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Hanna Geiran, director-general of the directorate, described the discovery as “incredible” in the statement.

The board of Management, said that the Sogne Bar, Club, receives “record-breaking of the the finder a reward for’ the discovery of the wreck.

NRK reported that the Sogne Bar Club has been searching for the wreck of the Juffrau Elizabeth for over 40 years. The wreckage was found on March 10, 2019 at the latest, according to NRK.

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Klungland, told Fox News that the dive club was founded in 1979. The divers, who later became a member of the club, had been on the look out for the remains of the, at that time, he says.

The Norwegian Maritime Museum to document the wreck site. Photogrammetry will be used to create a 3-d model of the wreck and an underwater drone that will take pictures of the wreckage. Some of the artifacts that will be picked up from the ship’s final resting place, according to officials.

In a separate project, the experts have employed virtual reality to create an amazing virtual dive on a 17th-century shipwreck. The Dutch merchant ship Melckmeyt, or “Milkmaid” was torn down a remote Icelandic island, on Feb. 16, 1659.

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The ship was on a secret trade mission when it sank during a sudden storm. Digital archaeology team from Australia’s Flinders University have been working with marine archeologists from the University of Iceland, is the creation of a 360 degree virtual view of the wreck, which was discovered in 1992.

Earlier this year, archaeologists in South Africa have announced the discovery of the long-lost wreck of a Dutch merchant who played a crucial role in colonial history.

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The voc-ship “Haarlem” or “New Haarlem”, who was stranded in Table Bay on the evening of the 25th of March, 1647.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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