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The study suggests a bizarre connection between lying and having sex

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It turns out that the people are not in a position to help you be dishonest, if they think it will lead to sex.

A new study claims that it is not only people who are saying things that they don’t believe in, in order to make an impression on potential business partners, but that the human brain may be hardwired to do it. This includes everything from small exaggerations to outright lies.

“People will say and do just about anything in order to make a connection with an attractive stranger,” the study claims.
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The researchers studied more than 600 of the students’ behavior as they interacted with members of the opposite sex, the New York Post reports. The findings were published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology.

“People will say and do just about anything in order to make a connection with an attractive stranger,” study author Gurit Birnbaum, said in a statement, which was published by the University of Rochester. “When the sexual system is activated, you will be motivated to present yourself in the best light possible. This means that you have to tell it to a stranger, the things that make you look better than you really are.”

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During the study, the subjects were divided into two groups: one was exposed to the sexual stimulus, whereas the other was exposed to a neutral stimulus.”

In the first phase of the study, the groups were asked to “argue” with members of the opposite sex. The participants, who “had been a “sexual strike” is more of a chance to have to agree with a contrary opinion. Researchers, on the theory that it was an attempt to create a “favorable impression” in order to increase the chance to get up close to them.

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In the second phase, the groups were asked to fill out a questionnaire about various personal preferences. They were then asked to interact with members of the opposite sex, and then you can fill in a new questionnaire, the person would see it.

Also, the participants seemed to be more likely to change their own opinions or answers that are contradicted by their earlier comments.

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Birnbaum, a professor of psychology at the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC) Herzliya in Israel, and has also worked with the University of Rochester, professor Harry Reis of the study.

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