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The republican senator addressed the potential to double U.S. anti-trust and tech leads

FILE PHOTO: The logo of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google are a combination of photos from Reuters of the files. – REUTERS

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Republican chairman of the Senate’s antitrust panel will be critical in the planning department of the Ministry of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission, in order to, if necessary, to examine four of the biggest U.S. tech companies.

The news broke earlier this month that the Justice Department would have to look at the Alphabet in Google and Apple Inc, while the FTC should probe Amazon.com Inc. and Facebook Inc. in order to determine whether or not they are abusing their enormous power on a market, the construction of which would have been unheard of a broad probe of some of the largest companies in the world.

In a statement announcing a hearing on the subject of the enforcement will be set for the following month, Senator Mike Lee, a Republican, and was chairman of the Judiciary Committee’s antitrust subcommittee, warned that the decision to make the distribution of the work, it would lead to a plethora of problems.

“In view of the similarity in the race, the issues involved, divvying-up of these studies is to waste resources and split the valuable expertise of the agencies, and is likely to result in a variety of law enforcement,” he said in a statement.

The big technology companies are facing a backlash in the United States and around the world, fueled by concerns among its competitors, regulators, and consumer groups that they will have to have a lot of power, and the damage caused to the user, and the business class.

Senator Amy Klobuchar, who is running for president and is the highest ranking Democrat in the panel, said she is pleased with the potential leads.

“It is critically important that we, the American people have a very good sense of what the agencies are doing to protect competition in this important part of our economy,” she said.

Separately, the House of Representatives and the Judiciary Committee opened its own inquiry into competition in the digital market place, with both Republicans and Democrats, are expressing concern about the power exercised by the tech giants.

Reporting by Diane Bartz; Editing by Dan Grebler

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