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The President of the flight attendants union, compares the cramped airplane seat in a ‘torture chamber’

to connectVideo5 things to say about the passenger airplanes that you probably didn’t know

Whether you’re a frequent flier, or have flown at a passenger aircraft once it is in your life, here are five things you need to know about the passenger planes.

Airplane passengers aren’t the only ones annoyed by tight seats on the current flight.

Lori Bassani, the president of the Association of Professional flight Attendants (AFPA), has repeatedly referred to the cramped seating situations, such as “torture” during a parliamentary hearing in front of a House Transportation and Infrastructure subcommittee on Wednesday.

THE VIDEO SHOWS THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT HIT THE CEILING DURING A SEVER AIR TURBULENCE

“We have found that the seats are not only getting smaller, but there is no padding on them. It has been a torture chamber for our customers and for us that fly our own airlines,” Bassani said.

“People are having a hard time… getting in and out of a normal process, but in an evacuation, it will be almost impossible,” said Lori Bassani, the president of the Association of Professional flight Attendants, during a parliamentary sub-committee hearing on “the State of Safety in the Aviation industry.”
(Alex Wong/Getty Images)

THE PASSENGER, A FINE OF $106G FOR THE VIOLENT OUTBURST

Bassani, one of which is the union that represents 28,000 American Airlines flight attendants, provided her testimony to the Subcommittee on Aviation hearing in the hopes that the FAA would be an evaluation of aircraft, standards, and evacuation procedures a review of it claiming it is “too late.”

Bassani, testified that the current guidelines for the seat pitch, the distance between the chairs does not allow for a number of passengers are properly set and the “brace” position in case of an emergency. She was convinced that the limited space would allow, today, the passengers have to evacuate within the time limit set by the FAA.

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“The truth is that many of the passengers were older, larger, and, in many cases, less mobility,” in her written testimony reads. At the hearing, she explained that, unlike in the past, planes are frequently fully booked, and the incidents of “air rage” are increasing.

“Can you imagine being in a stressful situation, try to evacuate in a real-life scenario?” she asked. “The passengers of a plane that is on fire, or if it is, you know, the half-tilted, or upside-down. Listen, these people are having a hard time… getting in and out of a normal process, but in an evacuation, it will be nearly impossible.”

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In her written testimony, Bassani is also focused on the fear of the rules and regulations related to the quality of the air, and the rest of the allowed time for the flight attendants, and the rules for emotional support animals.

“Passengers are looking at us, to be sure, in these difficult times,” she wrote. “Together with our flight deck, we would like to know and be able to communicate with the people who we have been, and will continue to be the safest and most secure aviation system in the world.”

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