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The arctic sea-ice minimum, tied for the second-lowest on record

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The amount of Arctic sea ice has reached its yearly minimum — and yet only about 1.6 million square miles.

According to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and this year it is the second-lowest on record, tied with the minimum levels reached in 2007, and 2016.

Since satellite records have been kept beginning in the late 1970s, NSIDC will report that the 13 is the smallest of the sea-ice minimums have all occurred in the last 13 years. The lowest amount of money that’s on the album, came out in 2012, the sea ice has dropped to the 1.37-million-square-feet.

The sea-ice minimum area was reduced from 12.8 per cent per decade over the past 40 years, which scientists believe is partly a result of climate change.

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Ilulissat Icefjord in Disko Bay, west Greenland. (With Martin Zwick/REDA&CO./Universal Images Group via Getty Images

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In a study published last month claimed that the sea ice in the Arctic could disappear entirely each summer, and in September, when the average global temperature to increase by as much as two degrees Celsius.

“The ice is declining, from June to September, and in September, it will begin to grow again in the seasonal cycle. And we’re saying we can’t have ice cream in September,” Chang said in a statement.

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Scientists have said that carbon pollution is warming the Arctic at a faster rate than the rest of the world, and thus to contribute to the melting of the sea ice.

Scholars have largely dismissed the fears of the human impact on global temperature and claimed that the climate change has been around since the beginning of time. There are also the dangers of a warming planet, it is heavily exaggerated, and the question of the impact of fossil fuels on climate change.

Fox News’ Chris Ciaccia, contributed to this report.

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