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The 500-year-old skeleton of a woman and a child were discovered in the Tower of London

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It is the skeleton of a woman and a child were discovered in the Tower of London, and is the first of the skeletons found at the famous and historical site is 50 years of age.

The fort, which is nearly 1,000 years old, is well known as a former prison and place of execution for those found guilty of high treason. Two of the six wives of King Henry VIII, Anne Boleyn and Catherine Howard, were beheaded in the Tower of the complex.

In a blog post, Kids, People, historic buildings curator for Historic Royal Palaces, which manages the Tower of London, which laid out the skeleton of the unknown woman and the child were revealed earlier this year. The archeologists saw it when she was digging up the entrance to the Tower of the Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula.

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Historic Royal Palaces curator, Alfred Hawkins, and to inspect any of the skeletons discovered in the Tower of London
(Historic Royal Palaces)

The site, which was part of a project for the improvement of the entrance to the chapel, and found the remains of a woman aged between 35 and 45 at the time of her death, and the skeleton of a 7-year-old child.

“These remains were found lying on their backs, and at the top (or back), and are in-line with their feet towards the east,” said Hawkins in a blog post. “Due to the presence of the coffin, the nails, the position of the skeletons, it is thought that an adult woman was buried in a coffin, and while it is likely that the infant is simply wrapped in a blanket (“dirty”) before they are buried.”

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The skeletal remains, which are believed to have been buried between 1450 and 1550, and was buried without any burial goods, and there were no signs of a violent death.

Analysis of the bones, it turned out, however, that both the woman and the child who has to endure a hard life…. “Both of the skeletons show signs of the disease, and that the adults show signs of chronic pain in the lower back. Their growth rate shows no need for a comfortable life, but it is not unusual for the period in which they lived,” said He.

The skeletons are thought to have been buried between 1450 and 1550. (Historic Royal Palaces)

The administrator stated that, while in the Tower of London’s role as a prison and place of execution, it is well-known, the castle was also home to a thriving community of people. “The castle has been occupied for nearly 1,000 years, but we have to keep in mind, it is not only a Palace, a Fortress and a Prison, but it is also a place for those of you who have worked within its walls,” he wrote.

The skeletal remains were found in a layer of centuries-old mortar, which, experts believe that it is a part of the floor of the King Edward I’s “lost” church, which was burnt down in 1513.

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“It was previously thought to be located in a different position, and because of this discovery, our understanding of the evolution of the oratory of st. Peter ad Vincula has been completely changed,” He wrote.

The skeletal remains were found during an excavation at the Tower of the Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula.
(Historic Royal Palaces)

Live Science is reporting that the skeletal remains are the first human remains to be found in the Tower of London since the mid-1970’s. The site was featured in an episode of the tv series “the Tower of London,” which was broadcast on Channel 5 in the uk earlier this week.

The skeletal remains were reburied in the Chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula, in a special ceremony on Sept. 10, 2019 at the latest.

A MEDIEVAL SKELETON UNEARTHED IN LONDON, WEARING AN EXPENSIVE LEATHER BOOTS

Night view of the White Tower at the Tower of London.
(Mike Kemp/In Pictures via Getty Images)

London continues to reveal new aspects of history. The long-lost remains of Captain Matthew Flinders, the explorer credited with giving Australia its name, were discovered in the vicinity of a London train station earlier this year. And in 2017, when archaeologists uncovered the remains of Greenwich Palace, where Henry VIII and Elizabeth I.

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In 2016, a historian discovered the secret notes hidden in the text of England’s first printed Bible. In the Latin Bible, published in 1535, by Henry VIII, a printer, revealed in the fascinating English language notes, created during the 16th-century protestant Reformation. Housed in the library of Lambeth Palace, the official London residence of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Bible, is one of the seven surviving copies.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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