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‘Technical problem’ that airline travelers across the country reportedly resolved following widespread computer failures

The failures were caused by a malfunction of the Sabre system, which is used by airlines during check-in and booking processes.
(iStock)

Travelers at major airports around the country were reporting widespread computer failures cause delays in several airlines, but the problem has reportedly been identified and resolved.

Passengers began on Twitter around 11 a.m. EST on Tuesday, complaining of delayed flights, and a computer outage reportedly affects American Airlines, Alaska Airlines and JetBlue, and preventing passengers from checking in for their flight.

American Airlines has now confirmed that the outage, attributing them to a “technical problem” caused by the Sabre computer systems, which are used by “multiple carriers.”

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Shortly after 11:30 pm, the airline indicated that the problem was solved.

“Earlier today, Sabre had a brief technical problem that affected several airlines, including American Airlines. This technical problem is resolved. We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience.”

JetBlue also confirmed are “systems are restored after a temporary interruption of Sabre systems that have an impact on multiple airlines. We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience.

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In the midst of the outage, Sabre himself tweeted that it is “aware” of the problem, while the recovery was “in progress.”

During the hiccups, travelers at Boston’s Logan airport, O’hare in Chicago, Dallas/Fort Worth, Seattle-Tacoma and Los Angeles International, among others, said they had been informed of the whole system, computer failures, or were experiencing more than average lines at the check-in.

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Another claimed to have seen staff “on the ground” at the airport “to work their tail off’ in the midst of failure.

A number of the passengers later reported computer systems is back up and operational shortly after 11:30 a.m, although the trip appeared to be delayed, it seemed

Sabre, which is based in Texas, describes itself as a “software and data solutions to help airlines market themselves, sell their products in both the direct and indirect channels, serve their passengers and operate efficiently.”

Representatives for Sabre, or Alaska Airlines, were not immediately available to respond to requests for comment on Tuesday morning downtime.

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This is a development of the story. Come back regularly for updates.

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