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Sudan, the world’s last male northern white rhino, died from age-related complications”

Researchers say Sudan has died after “age-related complications.”

(AP)

Sudan, the world’s last male northern white rhino died after “age-related complications,” the researchers announced Tuesday.

The 45-year-old rhino was euthanized Monday after his conditions ‘deteriorated significantly’ and he was not able even longer, the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya said in a statement.

There are now only two northern white rhinos in the world – his wife.

“He was a great ambassador for its kind and will be remembered for the work he did to raise awareness worldwide of the fate of the state is not only rhinos, but also the many thousands of other species that are threatened with extinction as a result of non-sustainable human activity,” said Richard Vigne, the group’s CEO.

Friday 28 July 2017 file photo, wildlife ranger Zechariah Mutai takes care of Sudan, the world’s last male northern white rhinoceros at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia district in Kenya.

(AP)

The last male northern white rhino was born in Sudan, is a Czech zoo, and then transferred to Kenya in 2009 was a bit of a celebrity. Last year, Sudan was listed as “The Most eligible bachelor in the World” on the dating app Tinder.

Sudan “has contributed significantly to the survival of his species if he is the father of two women,” the conservancy says. “In addition, genetic material was collected yesterday and offers hope for the future is trying on reproduction of northern white rhinos through advanced mobile technologies.”

The hope of the rescue of the species are now with Najin, 27, and her daughter, Fatu 18 – which are both in Ol Pejeta. A fourth female northern white rhino died in the Zoo of San Diego in 2015.

“He was a great ambassador for its kind and will be remembered for the work he did to raise awareness worldwide of the fate of the state is not only rhinos, but also the many thousands of other species that are threatened with extinction as a result of non-sustainable human activity.”

– Richard Vigne

Najin and Fatu are both able to reproduce – but the surrogacy process is complicated and expensive. The rhinos also have 24-hour anti-poaching security in Kenya, a country where poaching is a big problem. The animals are poached for their horns, which can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars because some believe it has medicinal value. The illegal rhino horn trade has even helped with the financing of the terrorist group al-Shabab, who has made millions with the slaughter of rhinos and elephants for their ivory.

“At the birth of only one rhino will not save the species,” Elodie Sampere, communications manager for the conservancy, told Fox News earlier this month. “We have at least 10 babies.”

Fox News’ Paul Tilsley, and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Ryan Gaydos is an editor for Fox News. Follow him on Twitter @RyanGaydos.

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