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Submarine of the swing: Why the Navy plans 32 new attack subs by 2034

File photo – Virginia-class attack submarine Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Indiana (SSN 789) departs Newport News Shipbuilding to carry out Alpha sea trials in the Atlantic Ocean – May 22, 2018.
(U. S. Navy photo courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat by Matt Hildreth/Released)

Destroying enemy ships and submarines, “spying” close to the enemy shores, causing massive firepower at strategic areas and the launch of a deadly undersea drones are all the missions of the Navy hope to see more of in the future-if the service plans to add as many as 32 attack submarines in the next 15 years.

In summary, the addition of attack submarines is the largest global platform rise within the Navy’s ambitious plans to grow the fleet to 355 vessels.

“Battle force inventory reaches 301 in 2020 and 355 in 2034,” the Lt. Cmdr. Kevin Chambers, told the Warrior Maven.

New Navy submarines are the host of an array of breakthrough technologies designed to cut a path into the future of the maritime war; all of these are more power such as Tomahawk missiles and torpedoes, is added, the electric energy for the emerging systems such as drones and AI-compatible sensors, navigation, and ship defense.

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As is apparent from the Navy’s most recent 30-year Shipbuilding Plan, the Navy budget is committed to the implementation of a new plan to build three Virginia-class attack submarines for some years ahead. This is designed, among other things to expected future attack submarine shortfall expected in the next decade. For quite some time, Combatant Commanders have expressed serious concerns that the availability of attack submarines remains dangerously lower than what is needed. Navy leadership is working with the Congress of the rev-up of the production.

The previous status quo had been for the Navy to attack the construction of two Virginia-Class boats per year in the years of 2020, when the construction of the new Columbia-Class nuclear submarines begins. The service moved to a plan to build two Virginia-class submarines and a Columbia-class submarine at the same time, according to the findings from an earlier Navy review.

The new Marine plan is to jump of up to three Virginia-class per year when Columbia-class production hits a lull in the “off years,” a senior service leaders have told Congress.

There are many reasons why attack submarines are more in demand; undersea vehicles are often able to conduct reconnaissance missions closer to targets than the large design of surface ships. Forward positioning enables them to be “stealthier” along the coast, bays and islands. As part of this, they can also move considerable firepower, in the form of Tomahawk missiles, closer to the objectives.

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Not only is the Marine to add significant firepower to the fleet of attack submarines, but the service is the emphasis improved “spy” as intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance missions. By making use of an opportunity to work closer to the enemy shores and threat areas than most ships, attack submarines can patrol the shallow waters near the enemy coast, scanning for enemy submarines, ships and shore threats.

Improved submarine navigation and detection technology with new sonar, increased computer automation and artificial intelligence, enable much quieter, faster movements in the coastal waters where the enemy mines, small boats and other threatening assets often operate.

Virginia-Class submarines are designed with a “Fly-by-Wire” capability which allows the ship to quietly linger in shallow waters, without, on the surface or any small movement by a human operator.

With “Fly-by-Wire” technology, a human operator to determine the depth and speed, allowing the software to make the movement of the aircraft and the rudder to keep course and depth, Navy program managers have told Warrior Maven. The ships can be mainly driven by software and electronics, thus freeing up your time and energy for an operator who is not required to manually input all of the little maneuver.

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“The main feature of the maneuver in the coastal waters, the fly-by-wire control system, where the computers in the control center to adjust electronically the submarine the control surfaces, a significant improvement of the hydraulic systems in the Los Angeles-class,” a 2016 Stanford University, “The Future of the Nuclear Submarines,” paper by Alexander Yachanin wrote.

This technology, with upgradable software and fast-growing AI applications, widens the mission envelope for the attack submarines by the strong growth of their ISR potential. With real-time analytics and instant ability to make use of a organize large databases of information, and the sensor input, computer algorithms can now perform a series of procedural functions traditionally performed by humans. This can increase speed of agility, and an attack submarine, with the ability to quickly change course, change of speed or change depth positioning when they are confronted with attacks.

“The main feature of the maneuver in the coastal waters, the fly-by-wire control system, where the computers in the control center to adjust electronically the submarine the control surfaces, a significant improvement of the hydraulic systems in the Los Angeles-class,” a 2016 Stanford University, “The Future of the Nuclear Submarines,” paper by Alexander Yachanin wrote.

This technology, with upgradable software and fast-growing AI applications, widens the mission envelope for the attack submarines by the strong growth of their ISR potential. With real-time analytics and instant ability to make use of a organize large databases of information, and the sensor input, computer algorithms can now perform a series of procedural functions traditionally performed by humans. This can increase speed of agility, and an attack submarine, with the ability to quickly change course, change of speed or change depth positioning when they are confronted with attacks.

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A closer-in or coast a submarine advantage, Navy strategy documents explain, can increase “on-shore” assault mission potential together with ISR-competent anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare operations.

The US Navy published the “Commander’s Intent for the United States Submarine Force”, published last year, writes – “We are unique in the state, and often the best work is in, stealthy, clandestine, and independent operations……. we exploit the advantages of a submarine to hide which enable us to: Behavior unnoticed activities, such as strategic deterrent patrols, intelligence collection, Special Operations Forces support, non-provocative transit and repositioning.”

The Navy is the deployment of elements of this strategy with the newly launched USS South Dakota, a Block III Virginia-Class attack submarine, designed with a series of new, unprecedented undersea technologies, Navy officials said.

Many of these innovations, which have been implemented and tested as prototypes for many years, are now operational, as the USS South Dakota is the service; service technology developers have, in general, said the developments in undersea technologies and built, integrated, tested and is now operational on the South Dakota are quieting technologies for the engine room to make the submarine harder to detect, a new large vertical array and more “noise” coating material for the hull, Marine officials have told Warrior Maven.

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The Block III Virginia-Class submarines have what is called a Large Aperture Bow conformal array sonar system designed to listen for an acoustic ping, the analysis of the return of the signal, and give the location and the possible contours of enemy ships, submarines and other threats.

The Block III Virginia-Class submarines have what is called a Large Aperture Bow conformal array sonar system designed for sending an acoustic ping, the analysis of the return of the signal, and give the location and the possible contours of enemy ships, submarines and other threats.

For Block V construction, the Navy is planning to insert a new 84-metre-long section designed to house additional missile capability. “Virginia Payload Modules.” The Virginia Payload Modules, come in the next few years, will the Tomahawk missile firepower of the submarines from 12 missiles to 40.

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The VPM submarines have an extra (about 84 feet) section with four additional Virginia Payload Tubes, each capable of carrying seven Tomahawk cruise missiles, for a ship with a total of 40 Tomahawks.

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