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SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket successfully launches

A SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket stands on the historic launch pad 39A as it is readied for its first demonstration flight at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, united states, February 5, 2018. REUTERS/Joe Skipper – RC19034E8FD0

SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket successfully launched on Tuesday, making history as the most powerful rocket and the introduction of a provierbial feather in Elon Musk’s cap.

With 27 engines of the rocket has a thrust-to be able to more than 5 million pounds, akin to the equivalent of 18 Boeing 747 aircraft. It will be able to lift a payload of more than 64 tonnes (141,000 lbs) in a job, twice as many as the Delta IV Heavy, at one-third of the cost, according to SpaceX. The payload of the Falcon Heavy is wearing a Tesla Roadster, code-named Starman, the playing of the David Bowie song with the same name.

The flight was originally scheduled for 1:30 pm EST, but was pushed back to 3:45 pm EST as a result of wind shear. The fired from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. SpaceX has said that if the rocket achieved lift off, “it will be the most powerful operational rocket in the world by a factor of two.” The company added that, “Falcon Heavy’s side cores are flight-proven—both previously supported independent Falcon 9 missions in 2016.”

SPACEX FALCON HEAVY LAUNCH: WHAT, WHEN, AND WHY

The successful launch marks the beginning of a very busy schedule in the space of the vehicle. Later this year, is scheduled to launch a communication satellite for a Saudi arabian satellite operator, Arabsat. It is also planned to start with a test payload for the U. S. Air Force as soon as June, so that the branch of the U.S. army to determine if the Falcon Heavy is capable of launching national security payloads.

The space vehicle has the first three-stage rocket boosters, and once it starts, SpaceX will try to get them all back for re-use. SpaceX has done this before with the Falcon 9 rocket, but only a first-stage booster and is a much smaller missile.

Follow Chris Ciaccia on Twitter @Chris_Ciaccia

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