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Southwest pilot Tammie Jo Shults reflects on life-changing of the flight: “We had help that day

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Pilot Tammie Jo Shults, who was previously a Navy fighter pilot had to make an emergency landing after an engine explosion; Linda Maloney, a friend and former fighter pilot, shares details about ‘The Story.’

Captain Tammie Jo Shults, the Southwest pilot who safely landed the plane that the victim of an air engine explosion, April 17, resulting in the death of a passenger, said that her life is not the same since the flight.

They also revealed that an aviation university, which tried again incident with a flight simulator, was not able to land in the same way as she and her co-pilot.

Shults talked about the impact of that day in her first public speaking appearance Tuesday, where she gave the keynote — “Leading in Uncertain Times” — in the National Retail Federation’s annual loss prevention conference in Grapevine, Texas.

It was Later revealed that Shults was’t even supposed to be on the flight that day, but had traded routes with her husband, who is also a Southwest pilot.

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The hero pilot, who was praised for her calm demeanor during the emergency landing of the Flight 1380 in Philadelphia, was piloting the Boeing 737 from New York’s LaGuardia Airport and Dallas Love Field as the jet blew an engine and lost a window at 32,000 feet.

It was Later revealed that Shults was’t even supposed to be on the flight that day, but had traded routes with her husband, who is also a Southwest pilot, so that they could attend their son’s track meet.

Shults’ the co-pilot, Darren Ellisor, was flying the plane when they first heard of the explosion, and the plane rapidly lost pressure and under an angle of about 40 degrees to the side. After donning their oxygen masks, Shults took over and Ellisor began to communicate with the other members of the crew, the Dallas Business Journal reports.

During her keynote, Shults revealed what it was like to be on the aircraft when it experienced rapid depressurization, compare the feeling with a balloon as the air is removed. “We practice emergency procedures all the time. But, physically having your air sucked out of your lungs is not something that you practice,” she said, according to the Magazine.

The 56-year-old pilot has many years of experience in the aviation industry, which as one of the first female pilots in AMERICAN military history and the later accession to Southwest in 1993.

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While the 56-year-old pilot has many years of experience in the aviation industry, which as one of the first female pilots in AMERICAN military history and the later accession to Southwest in 1993, she largely credits God with helping her land Flight 1380 that day.

“The EMT said,” You don’t even have an increased heart rate,’ That is not within my reach. I can use my voice sometimes, but that’s one of those things that are God-given,” Shults said.

They also showed in her speech that an aviation university again the conditions of the flight, with the help of a simulator, but they were not able to land the plane without the use of flight automation program aboard the virtual aircraft, according to the Magazine.

“Darren and I made no use of flight automation that day,” Shults said. “While we are a good team, I think we’re not that good. We had help that day.”

Since the shocking event, Shults has a meeting with President Trump, appeared on ABC’s “20/20” and is now stopped in the airport by passengers may want to take a picture of her.

(AP)

Since the shocking event, Shults has a meeting with President Trump, appeared on ABC’s “20/20” and is now stopped in the airport by passengers want a picture of her, according to Dallas News.

They also said that they are given is an upgrade of the parking lot: The pilot who flies a small plane to work on the Field, Love of her home in Boerne, Texas, now parks in the Southwest maintenance hangar.

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Shults recently got back in the cockpit for the first time since the accident, flying from Houston to Puerto Vallarta.

“I said to my husband: ‘I need to go fly. I have a piece of normal, ” she said, per the Dallas News.

However, during the flight Shults remain anonymous, to the crew not to announce her name until she landed. At that time, her identity was revealed and they took photos with the passengers.

“I was very excited, to be honest,” Shults said of her first flight back. “I love flying,” Shults said, according to the Magazine.

Michelle Gant is a writer and editor for Fox News Lifestyle.

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