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‘Smoking and sleeping together risk factors in sudden infant death syndrome’

‘Smoking and sleeping together risk factors in sudden infant death syndrome’

The combination of smoking during pregnancy and parents who are in the same bed as their infants, would be ‘extremely dangerous’ for babies.

Infants of this risk group would be no less than 32 times as likely to have sids, according to new research that was published in the New Zealand Medical Journal.

During the study was a three-year study (1987-1990) from New Zealand will be re-examined with a patient review. In such studies a group of patients with a specific disorder compared to a group of patients who have this condition.

In total, there were 137 cases of sids during the three years of the investigation, between march 2012 and February 2015 was carried out.

Risk factors

In New Zealand, the number of babies that dies of sids is higher than in other countries. In particular, for Māori’is the number of deaths is high.

The two biggest risk factors for sids would be smoking during the pregnancy (six times the risk), and the sharing of the parental bed (five times the risk). The combination of the two would be 32 times the risk of sudden infant death syndrome cause compared to infants with both risk factors do not apply.

“Our research shows that many of the risk factors that were demonstrated in the original research today, it is still relevant,” said lead researcher professor Edwin Mitchell from the University of Auckland. “The combination of smoking during pregnancy and the sharing of the parental bed is extremely dangerous for babies.”

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