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Scientists search for the ‘lost’ Stone Age settlement in ‘Doggerland’ at the bottom of the north sea

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Scientists are in search of a lost Stone Age settlement in the prehistoric landscape on the bottom of the north sea known as Doggerland.

Experts look at the southern north sea, such as the location of the lost prehistoric settlement. Prior to the rise of the sea level at the end of the last ice age, about 8,000 to 10,000 years ago, the area was part of a piece of land connecting Britain to what is now the mainland of Europe.

Earlier this month, experts from the united kingdom and Belgium, on the research vessel RV Belgica for the analysis of the seabed using acoustic technology. Physical samples were also retrieved from the seabed.

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Scientists studied an area of Doggerland called the Brown Bank, a 18.6 km long sand ridge, located approximately 62 km north-east of Great Yarmouth on the british coast, and about 49.7 km west of the Dutch coast.

The research vessel RV Belgica. (© Of The Belgian Navy)

Professor Vincent Gaffney, from the U. K. ‘ s University of Bradford, told Fox News that, despite the “crap again,” the research went well. “We have found evidence for a forest under the sea – probably about 10,000 years old,” he said via e-mail. “We are sampling this and will the have dated, but if it comes from the old turf, we are full of confidence.”

Similar forests can be seen at the edges of great Britain at low tide, but this is in the middle of the north sea, according to Gaffney. The forest, he says, is the first of its kind found in a deepwater environment.

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“We are now sure of is that there is preserved landscape, with well-preserved peat, that we can continue to explore,” he added. “This is an environment in which people would have lived.”

2019 exploration areas on the Brown Banks and the South River.
(© Lost Boundaries/VLIZ/UGenT)

The expedition was led by Dr. Tine Miassiaen of the Flanders Marine Institute (VLIZ) in Belgium, as part of the Belgian/Dutch/UK project with the title “Deep History: the Reveal of the palaeo-landscape of the Southern north sea.” It is also a supplement on the University of Bradford led Lost Borders Project, which is funded by the European Research Council and aims to map Doggerland.

The Lost Boundaries team has already identified thousands of miles of plains, hills, swamps and river valleys on the seabed, although hard evidence of human activity has escaped the notice of researchers.

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Nevertheless, the fishermen have a large number of archaeological objects in the Brown Sofa on the year, including stones and human remains.

DNA-sampling of the cores by the Lost Borders team from the University of Warwick. (@Lost Boundaries)

Gaffney said that more research will be carried out later this year. “Because we lost so much time, we go back later in the year for more peat and sediments to explore this forest further and find the settlement, we know that they are there,” he explained.

Grab sampler for use at sea. (Belgian Navy)

Fascinating sea bed discoveries have been made elsewhere in the united kingdom, A mysterious sunken prehistoric forest, for example, was recently revealed on a French beach in the aftermath of the Storm Hannah, which battered much of the united kingdom in the last month.

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