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Scientists, a place of merging of two galaxies from 13 billion years ago

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Scientists have developed one of the most distant examples of the merging of the two galaxies, the results have been published this week.

Researchers in Japan observed a distant light source known as B14-65666, located in the constellation known as the Sextans, with the help of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array of telescopes in Chile.

The data suggested that the object could be a single galaxy, the formation of new stars as the result of an accident in the area.

Previous observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and was revealed to the two star clusters in the B14-65666.

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An artist’s impression of the merger of the galaxies, which is also known as B14-65666, about 13 billion light-years away.
(National Astronomical Observatory of Japan)

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Takuya Hashimoto, a post-doctoral fellow of the japan society for the Promotion of Science and Waseda University, Japan, pointed out that the signs on the constellation and had to travel 13 billion light years to reach them.

This means that researchers will be able to explore what the galaxy looked like 13 billion years ago, or less than 1 billion years after the Big Bang.

“The discovery of radio waves from the three components in a far-away object clearly shows at ALMA’s high-capacity, in order to explore the distant universe,” Hashimoto said in a press release.

Scientists will continue to use this type of research is to explore the origins of the universe.

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“In the very early universe, and it seems to be a very exciting time to be part of a star system, with a lot of the violent collision, and anything that is similar to the ordered structures that we see in later times,” And Brown, an associate professor at the University of Arizona, told Gizmodo.

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