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Rome doesn’t allow tourists to sit on the famous Spanish Steps and imposes steep fines for offenders

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The city of Rome has banned tourists sit on the Spanish Steps, and the offenders can face a fine of up to $280, according to a new report.

The police force began to patrol in, 136 steps in, on a Tuesday, and definitely will go call in every one of you, The Guardian reported. Sit down and are caught, the cost is 250 euros, or about $280. If you are caught damaging the work or the worry of making a mess, the penalty rises to up to 400 euros, or about $450.

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The new restriction was adopted in the beginning of June, when I had rules forbidding jumping in fountains, rolling suitcases, to walk around without a shirt on, or take part in a “messy food” from the monuments, according to The Guardian.

A police officer asked a woman to sit on the Spanish Steps in Rome, Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2019 at the latest.
(AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

The new line has a number of the inhabitants of the region, and that they will be banned from sitting on the stairs, and a local art critic and former deputy culture minister, also identified as the “fascist style of rule.”

“The protection of a historical monument, it is easy to find, of course, you should not eat it on the stairs, but the ban is really excessive. It seems to me to be a fascist-style provision that the city will be forced to review,” Vittorio Sgarbi, told AdnKronos, an Italian news agency reported, according to The Guardian.

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The steps, which were built in the early 18th century to connect the Piazza di Spagna to the church Trinità dei Monti church. They are located about 15 minutes north-east of the central station, to the base.

In 2016, the steps of the restoration, it underwent a 1.5 million euros, or about $1.6 million in today’s market, is paid by Italian jewellery firm Bulgari.

Coffee stains, wine stains and wads of chewing gum were said to have been removed, The newspaper reported.

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However, while the tourists will be able to let it often be used, with a number of local residents still don’t like the idea of a ban on it at all.

Tommaso Tanzilli, director of the Italian hotels association, told The Guardian: “We are all agreed that people shouldn’t “camp” and eat it on the steps of the monuments, and if the waste is left behind. However, the criminalisation of a people for a sit down, especially if they are elderly, it is a bit of an exaggeration.”

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However, there are some people who are in favor of the ban, including from a local company.

“This is a return to utrecht, the netherlands. In order to try to control anyone, it is the damage to the monument, and to eat and drink, you would have a policeman for every tourist,” Gianni Battistoni, president of a local association of businesses, said The newspaper.

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