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Rare nickel at the auction in Philadelphia purchased for $4.56 million

The Eliasberg 1913 Liberty Head nickel at the auction in Philadelphia took almost $5 million from an anonymous buyer Wednesday. The currency is named after the financier Louis E. Eliasberg, who bought the coin in 1948, and amassed one of the largest coin collections in the AMERICAN history. (Stack’s Bowers Galleries via AP)

An extremely rare nickel at the auction in Philadelphia, fetched $4.56 million from an anonymous buyer Wednesday.

The Stack’s Bowers Galleries offered the Eliasberg 1913 Liberty Head Nickel for auction during the American Numismatic Association World’s Fair of Money.

“This is really a memorable sale, and one for the history books,” Brian Kendrella, president of Stack’s Bowers Galleries, told WPVI. “The new owner of the Eliasberg nickel currently has one of the rarest, most valuable United States coins, and one of only three examples of this coveted medal in their own hands.”

The currency is named after the financier Louis E. Eliasberg, who bought the coin in 1948, and amassed one of the largest coin collections in the AMERICAN history.

This special nickel is one of only five ever produced in the Third Philadelphia Mint.

“No one knows the circumstances of the production,” Vicken Yegparian, vice president of numismatics at Stack’s Bowers Galleries, said. “This is the best of the five is known as the Eliasberg specimen.”

As Fox News previously reported, Yegparian said that the five Liberty Head nickels were produced, just before the AMERICAN Currency started the production of nickels with a Buffalo Head.

“Of the remaining four, two from the market — a donated to the Smithsonian in the ’70s, and one was donated to the American Numismatic Association in the 1980s,” he said. “There are still two others in private hands.”

Rare coins are big business. Earlier this year, a small $5 gold coin produced by the San Francisco Mint during the height of the California Gold Rush was estimated at a value of “millions of dollars.” The currency of the owner in the first instance, had thought that the money was fake.

Fox News’ James Rogers, Chris Ciaccia, and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Frank Miles is a journalist and editor, covering sports, tech, military and geopolitical for FoxNews.com. He can be reached at Frank.Miles@foxnews.com.

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