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Police test a new restraint technology

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Las Vegas company unveils new restraint weapon for the police

Law enforcement officials attend a demonstration of the Bolawrap, a non-lethal weapon meant to help the police deal with mentally ill suspects.

Police officers in Illinois are testing a new restraint weapon designed for situations where lethal force is not justified.

In the gun at the Buffalo Grove Police, officers from different suburbs and police were testing the new technology, known as the “BolaWrap.”

Wrap Technologies with the hand-held remote control restraint device that fires an 8-foot Kevlar to bind to a range of up to 25 metres.

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The Las Vegas-based company says it is designed to oppress people who are unruly or uncooperative without having to resort to lethal violence. The new weapon can be used if a person is a threat to harm themselves or suffer from a mental illness.

Advocates have for the last few years the name on the police nationwide to rethink their use of force policy in the midst of the murders of the black population during the interactions with the officials of the law enforcement.

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(Fox News)

“I think that it is just another tool in the toolbox for the officers as they confront might be a mentally ill person or a subject who wants to commit suicide. This can be a powerful tool to help the officer control of the subject,” Steve Casstevens, Buffalo Grove Police chief, told Fox 32.

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The station reports that the “BolaWrap” costs $800 dollars and each tether cartridge is $30 dollars. It has just gone into production and is used by a few law enforcement agencies in California.

“The first impressions are very good,” said Aurora police chief Kristen Ziman.

Ziman explained that her only concern about the technology the danger of the tether wrapping around the purpose of the neck.

“But there are a number of moments where we have to deal with topics that are going to resist arrest, and so we have to move to the force continuum. And this is a suitable instrument,” Ziman said.

Christopher Carbone is a reporter and news editor covering science and technology for FoxNews.com. He can be reached at christopher.carbone@foxnews.com. Follow him on Twitter @christocarbone.

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