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Paul Manafort struggled to pay the bills in 2016, accountant testifies

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Manafort shopping habits called into question during the process

The judge in the case rejected a photo of Manafort’s designer clothing as evidence. Peter Doocy explained, on ‘Special Report.’

The former trump-campaign-Chairman Paul Manafort broke up large bills, but struggled to pay them in 2016, his accountant, said in Federal court Thursday.

Heather Washkuhn of the accounting company NKFSB said Manafort, a customer from 2011 to 2018 was, and she was often in contact with him by E-Mail to him “several times a week.” Washkuhn said their company charged Manafort over $100,000 per year for his services.

“It has come a time in 2016, if Mr. Manafort had trouble paying its bills?” Prosecutor Greg Andres asked the accountant in the Federal court in Alexandria, Va.

“Yes,” Washkuhn replied.

Manafort, with a view to the bank’s fees and the tax evasion in connection with his work in the Ukraine, has pleaded not guilty. He also faces charges in a separate Federal case in Washington.

He served as Chairman of the trump presidential campaign in the summer of 2016, when he was forced, in August of the year in the midst of the news about his relations with the Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych.

Prosecutors presented a variety of exhibits and several witnesses to paint the as part of your effort are in the process of the call, Manafort, how to report a tax scofflaw who has failed the money for luxury goods spending to get — then lied to bank loans, when its foreign consulting work dried up.

In court on Thursday, prosecutors showed an E-Mail from 2016 In it, Washkuhn sends Manafort is a list of the bills and asks him to go through the list and tell you which numbers, and how a financing.

She also went on an E-Mail from former Manafort partner Rick Gates questions Washkuhn if you could make a drawing on a series of Manafort credit against collateral. She replied in the Mail that it is to draw, from.

During opening arguments this week, the team of defence made it clear, you want to blame Gates, the handles some day-to-day business activities for Manafort, for many of the alleged reporting deficiencies.

Washkuhn, testified Thursday she went to the gates, if they could not reach, Manafort.

Especially, Washkuhn also testified she had no knowledge of the foreign investments owned by Manafort, including the 14 various foreign LLCs that the government has said, have been the shell companies that he controlled.

MANAFORT IS THE CASE, ASSESS, WARN MÜLLER-TEAM, YOU CAN’T PROVE A CONSPIRACY WITHOUT STAR WITNESSES

The government on Thursday also exhibits that you say, produces the wrong balance in 2015, have been doctored, which had Manafort, to make it look like he is, $4 million more than he is. The government says Manafort used to request the document, a loan from the Banc of California.

Prosecutors on Thursday also the question of James Philip Ayiff, a CPA, prepared the tax returns, the government claims, Manafort submitted illegally.

Prosecutors Ayiff testimony used to prove to say that a CPA bid based on the client, the truth about your financial information.

“We rely on that information to prepare the tax return,” Ayliff said.

Earlier Thursday, US District Court judge T. S. Ellis, III government warned prosecutors that they cannot prove, an important part of your case, unless prosecutors call Gates.

Referencing gates, Ellis, prosecutors said in court she “can’t prove a conspiracy without him.”

Gates is cooperating with the prosecution and was considered a potential star witness. Prosecutors suggested Wednesday that he may not be called to the stand, after all.

But on Thursday, Andres, the Prosecutor, said the government has always testify to the “firm intention” of calling goals.

Manafort left the court building in a Chrysler minivan, but he was not seen by the vehicle with tinted Windows. Friday in the trial will continue with more testimony from Ayliff.

Fox News’ Anne Ball and Gregg Re, and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Alex Pappas is a political reporter at FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter at @Alex Pappas.

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