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Nuclear crocodile? Florida’s power plants will help in the protection of reptiles, once almost extinct,

to connectVideoCrocodiles to thrive outside of Florida, the nuclear power plant

American alligators were once on the brink of extinction, but now they number about 2,000 of them, and one out of four calls to the 170 km of the nuclear cooling canals of the house; and Phil Keating reports.

South Florida’s biggest nuclear power plant, Turkey Point provides electricity to one million customers.

However, it is a plant of the other customers, who receive special attention, as it is right now they are just coming out of their shells.

Baby American alligators, once on the brink of extinction, crawling back to, and build upon it in, of all places, the nuclear power plant operated by Florida Power & Light.

“The total length of the…25.7,” said Mike Lloret de mar, is a wildlife biologist, crocodile specialist and member of the FPL’s “Croc’s Team,” as it is measured on a 4-day-old boy.

“They’re NOT radioactive,” he added, and that is a question he gets asked all the time.

THE EX-MARINE OUT OF FLORIDA, WORKING WITH ALLIGATORS AND CROCODILES, AND SAYS THAT THEY ARE HER “BEST FRIENDS”

During the period, which will happen in July and August, the team will hop on the airboats, and sail up and down the Turkey’s Point of 168 miles, from the water of the canals, in search of a crocodile’s nest. This month, they found 27 nests, and saved to 300 small feathers, which are very cute, at least for the time being.

In the lab, they will measure and weigh it and get a micro-chip inserted in their tails. They may be kept for a lifetime.

The american crocodile lives in Southern Florida. Back in the 1970’s, there were only about 500 of these, and the species has been listed as an “endangered species.” Since then, they have rebounded, crawling up to one of the better listing of “endangered,” with an estimated 2,000-roaming Turkey Point Crocodile Lake, and the Everglades National Park.

FLORIDA’S CROCODILES HAVE BEEN SPOTTED WITH A SWIMMING-POOL NOODLE TO CROSS THE CHANNEL

About 25% of the crocs in a telephone call with the nuclear power plant, which is also a crocodile sanctuary, and go home.

A biologist, Lloret de mar live and breathe crocs, and find the FPL, the program is incredibly fulfilling.

“It’s really just seeing the fruits of your labor, you know,” he said. “There’s a whole year waiting for this moment, waiting for that baby to come out, and the collection of the babies and then release them, that’s just the ultimate satisfaction.”

However to thrive in this unlikely, a nuclear location is due to all the canals, and the roads between them and with the very minimum of human events, as it is a high-security facility.

As soon as the boy come out into the world, and the world team over to rescue them, and take them back to the lab, and she wanted it to.

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“As soon as they hit the water, they will know exactly what to do with it,” said Lloret. From there, the little crocs are now ready for the world.

Each of the nests, containing 30 to 50 eggs, but the boy did not survive, due to predation by birds, fish and even other crocodiles.

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