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Nevada votes to eliminate ‘tampon tax’ on feminine hygiene products

Women in Nevada will now be able to buy feminine hygiene products without paying the so-called “tampon tax.”
(iStock)

Women in Nevada will now be able to buy feminine hygiene products without paying a so-called “tampon tax.”

People of the state on Tuesday voted to remove the almost 7 percent state sales tax on these items, Vox reported. More than 50 percent of the voters chose to eliminate the tax, according to the news station KTNV. The move makes Nevada the tenth state to do away with what is also known as the “pink tax.”

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The ballot measure, known as Question 2, was first proposed by state Sen. Yvanna Cancela, and Sen. Joyce Woodhouse, both Democrats.

Proponents of the measure argue that the application of vat on feminine hygiene products is a discriminatory practice, if these items are a necessity for women during their menstrual cycle.

“These products are not a luxury but a basic need of life that the women begins around the age of 12 up to their early 50s,” the measure states, with the argument that feminine hygiene products are considered “medical devices” and, like other medical devices that are currently exempted from the national vat — such as bandages and splints, should also be exempt.

But those against the measure say that removing the sales tax from these items “will lead to less revenue for the State and local governments, including school districts.”

“This loss of income can have a negative impact on the provision of provincial and local government agencies. California is regarded as to exempt these products in 2016, but the Governor vetoed the proposal because of concerns about loss of revenue,” opponents of Question 2 argue that in the measure.

With the passage of the proposal, to Marketplace an estimate of the state for approximately $5 million to $ 7 million in revenue-an amount Sen. Cancela told the publication is “quite small in comparison with the rest of the biennial budget, which was $8.1 billion in 2017.

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“Feminine hygiene products are primarily purchased for women and the sales tax on what is medically necessary devices disproportionately affects women. And I think that the removal of a load, such as that of our tax code, and is important in the direction of equality,” the senator said, adding of the proposal deletes “a gender burden of our tax code.”

It is important to note, however, that there is not a “special” sales tax on feminine hygiene products; rather, they are “subject to Nevada sales tax, similar to many other items,” the Tax Foundation states.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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