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Navajo Code Talker Samuel Tom Holiday dies at age 94

Samuel Tom Holiday, one of the last surviving Navajo Code Talkers, died at the age of 94 in Utah on Monday.

(Marines)

Samuel Tom Holiday, one of the last surviving Navajo Code Talkers, died at the age of 94 on Monday in the us state of Utah.

Holiday, who uses his own language to create an uncrackable code to help win the second world War, spent his days later, living in Southern Utah Veterans Home in Ivins, his granddaughter told The Spectrum.

Tya Redhouse told the newspaper that the Vacation will be buried on the Navajo Reservation in Kayenta, Arizona, next to his wife.

The 93-year-old died surrounded by friends and family, who traveled with him, and she told the Spectrum.

The holiday went through the Marine Corps boot camp at the age of 19 in 1943 and was a member of a group of indians who have their own language to the development of the communication code for the U.S. army in world War 2 that turned out to be uncrackable.

The Marines of the shared news of his death on Tuesday, writing on Twitter:

“Yesterday, Navajo Code Talker Samuel Tom Holiday, died at the age of 94 years. Holiday, one of the last surviving Code Talkers of the second world WAR, was a member of the Corps at 19 and was a part of a legendary group of indians that coded messages in the Navajo language.

Semper Fi.”

Yesterday, Navajo Code Talker Samuel Tom Holiday, died at the age of 94 years.

Holiday, one of the last surviving Code Talkers of the second world WAR, was a member of the Corps at 19 and was a part of a legendary group of indians that coded messages in the Navajo language.

Semper Fi pic.twitter.com/Lbl2D3l5Jn

— U.S. Marines (@USMC) June 12, 2018

Holiday later shared his experiences in “Under the Eagle: Samuel Holiday, Navajo Code Talker,” a book that he wrote together with Robert S. McPherson. It was published in 2013 by the University of Oklahoma Press, and is the “only book-length oral history of a Navajo code talker in which the narrator relates his experiences in his own voice and words.”

During the war, Holiday served with the 25th Marine Regiment, 4th Marine Division, and was involved in operations in Kwajalein, Saipan, Tinian and Iwo Jima, which he wrote about in his book.

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He was injured by an exploding mortar in one of his ears, which he said left him with some hearing loss, according to The Spectrum. He Later received a Purple Heart, in addition to a Congress of the Silver Medal.

Under the Eagle, the co-author of the Navajo Code Talker Samuel Holiday

In an interview last year with The Spectrum, Holiday said he was mistaken for a Japanese soldier by his fellow Americans on two occasions and was defended by those who knew him. Even with these incidents, the Navy said that his dedication to the cause never wavered.

Navajo leaders believe less than 10 Code Talkers are still alive today. The exact number is unknown, because the program remained classified for a number of years after the war.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Travis Fedschun is a reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @travfed

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