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More than half of violent crimes in the U.S. are never reported to the police

In 2016, “U.S. residents age 12 or older experienced 5.7 million violent victimizations,” according to Justice Dept. statistics. A majority of the crimes, some 58 percent of the DoO said, were never reported to the police.

(FILE PHOTO/JaysonPhotography)

October is recognized as National Crime Prevention Month, but the statistics of the Ministry of Justice show the best way for the Americans to prevent that criminal activity may be to just start with picking up their phone.

The u.s. department of justice the Bureau of Justice Statistics says in its most recent National Criminal Victimization Survey (NCVS) that in 2016, “U.S. residents age 12 or older experienced 5.7 million violent victimizations.” A majority of the crimes, some 58 percent of the u.s. department of justice says, are never reported to the police.

Serious violent crimes, which have been analyzed as a subset of “violent crime,” are reported only 49 percent of the time, according to the survey. The definition includes “rape or sexual assault, robbery, and aggravated assault.”

“In 2016, U.S. residents age 12 or older experienced 5.7 million violent victimizations—a rate of 21.1 victimizations per 1,000 persons aged 12 years or older… Less than half (42%) of the violent victimizations were reported to the police.”

– U.S. Dept. of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics

According to the u.s. department of justice data provided to Fox News, that the victim in the past have cited a variety of reasons for not reporting their experiences to the authorities. Most important factors include the fear of retaliation, or the feeling that the incident was a private or personal matter.

Another common refrain, according to BJS data, is the idea that the police would not bother to investigate, they would not be effective, or they can lead to problems for the victim.

Statistics from the FBI indicate these objections can be in conflict with the successes that AMERICAN law enforcement agencies in solving crimes – at least those who are brought to their attention. According to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report (UCR), which also includes the details of the law enforcement in the whole country, of AMERICAN institutions were able to almost half (45.6%) of any violent crimes brought to their attention on a kind of closing in 2016.

And when it comes specifically to the murder, the AMERICAN law enforcement officials are apparently even more efficient – clearing some 59.4 percent of the cases that their attention in 2016.

The FBI says that “in 2016, 45.6% of violent crimes and 18.3% of property crimes were cleared by arrest or exceptional means.”

(FILE/Getty Images)

The idea that victims do not report their experiences to the police, because they believe that the police can’t or won’t help, despite the evidence showing that almost half of all cases in which their attention is usually fixed, is a theme of the u.s. department of justice hopes to explore further by expanding the way it collects information from victims.

Lynn Langton, the Chief of Victimization Statistics at the Bureau of Justice Statistics, told Fox News that one of her agency’s primary goals in redesigning the methodology behind the NCVS “is to really expand on what we capture in terms of… victim experiences with the police when they contact the police.”

“When clients have contact with the police, the vast majority of them feel that the police treated them fairly and had respect.”

– Lynn Langton, chief of Victimization Statistics, department of justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics

“The question of the respondent victim satisfaction with the police is important that we don’t currently measure,” said Langton.

Yet she wants more victims would contact authorities if they have a kind of victimhood.

“When clients have contact with the police, the vast majority of them feel that the police treated them fairly and were respectful,” said Langton. “But in order to be able to look at the variety and the variation in terms of how the respondents think about the police and how that related to their chance to respond and contact the police is an important topic.”

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