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Millennials love smartphones, but I’m not sure why

A passenger uses his smartphone as he waits for the train at a subway station in Istanbul, Turkey, on 14 June 2017. REUTERS/Murad Sezer – RTS171LU

I’ve never complained about this

each
extent, but yes, there is a technological gap between young and old. It has to do with the mobile revolution.

Anyone under the millennial cut—off generally younger than 36 years—uses computers differently than the generations before them. The millennial person has no problem with a phone for everything from surfing the web to watching a feature-length film.

I am always amazed by this. I find it weird.

Who likes reading a 5-inch screen when you get the 30-inch monitors hooked to real computers? On the big screen, you can open multiple windows, and the cross-referencing without having to deal with a ridiculously small screen. The crappy CRT screen on the Osborne One from 37 years ago was bigger, and it was the least I’ve ever seen connected to a computer.

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What is the point of watching a movie on a phone? There are larger screens on the back of the airplane chairs. Most people have access to a larger screen, or an actual (gasp) TELEVISION. Watch the movie!

 

It is possible that some of these films to stream via the phone, and people can’t figure out how to go through a HDMI port or converter and watch the movie on an actual larger screen? This should be taught in school, but it is not.

I usually do not have a phone, unless I go for a drive and you may need to call in case of emergency. It is also useful if you go to the store to shop for someone and the item you requested is not available and you need to buy something else. You never want to hear, “Why did you buy that? You should call me.” I also use the phone for navigation in unfamiliar cities. That’s about it.

This is a different pattern of use than millennials, and even people of my age who are addicted to the use of the phone. But the

oldest
as I recall, there is still do not use the phone if the serving.

I have learned a few things over the years that I think will help us non-millennials. My top tip: millennials love the use of smartphones so much that they are happy to act as unpaid secretaries for you. Instead of agonizing over a lookup, just ask one of them to do it. They have always obliged with glee. It is great.

I would say someone to search themselves, but millennials are looking for an excuse to try something and read the findings out loud as you sit back. This is great on a table. You can be a lot of them all looking stuff for you in the competition.

Suddenly, I see the value of these phones.

To go a step further. Smartphones are usually on unlimited calling plans, so borrow one from a stranger to call. I have done this, often while they claim that my phone battery is dead. The fact is, I forget to take the phone. The battery is completely empty, it calls sympathy. When you ask a foreigner, they always ask if you are going to call China. Laugh and say, “No, it’s local.” Of course, you have to memorize all the numbers you might call. A small sacrifice.

Yes, this technology gap works for me.

This article originally appeared on PCMag.com.

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