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Maryland suspect declared ‘not a threat’ in 2013; paper selected at a cost: police

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New details on suspected Annapolis newsroom shooter

The 38-year-old Jarrod Ramos is charged with five counts of first-degree murder for the attack on the Capital Gazette; Lea Gabrielle reports.

The police investigated Capital Gazette shooting suspect Jarrod Ramos in 2013, but concluded he was no threat, while the newspaper does not want to pursue a lawsuit against him for fear of “a stick in a beehive,” a police report released Friday said.

Ramos, 38, was assessed that year after a barrage of Twitter messages that are focused on Gazette staff. But the paper did not want to press charges or seek a restraining order for fear of inflaming the situation, the 2013-the police says.

“As we write this, the Capital will not pursue any charges,” Detective Michael Praley wrote. “It was described as putting a stick in a beehive, where the Capital Newspaper representatives did not wish to do so.”

“As we write this, the Capital will not pursue any charges. It was described as putting a stick in a beehive, where the Capital Newspaper representatives did not wish to do so.”

– Detective Michael Praley, writing in 2013 at the police

Praley said in the report that he did not believe that Ramos “was a threat to the employees” on the paper, noting that Ramos had not tried to the building and had not sent “directly, threatening correspondence.”

This week Tom Marquardt, the paper is a retired former publisher, said he spoke with the newspaper’s lawyers about the search of a temporary restraining order in 2013, but not because he and others thought that it would be able to elicit Ramos in something worse.

“We decided to take the course of laying low,” Marquardt said Friday.

“We decided to take the course of laying low.”

– Tom Marquardt, a retired former publisher, Capital Gazette

Ramos allegedly had an old grudge against the newspaper, which the authorities said resulted Thursday in one of the deadliest attacks on journalists in AMERICAN history. Ramos is accused of killing three editors, a reporter and a sales assistant.

The Laurel, Md., the man had filed a defamation lawsuit against the paper in 2012 after it ran an article about him plead guilty to harassment of a woman who is his former high school classmate. A judge dismissed the case in 2014.

Thereafter, Ramos allegedly posted angry, profanity-laced tweets about the paper, the reporters and editors, often with the help of the hashtag #CapDeathWatch.

Ramos is also linked to a 2011 harassment case involving a former high school classmate, authorities said.

Brennan McCarthy, the lawyer who represented the former classmate, said Ramos’ harassment of her malicious and that was the “worst case of harassment and stalking I’ve ever encountered in my career,” says USA Today.

Ramos’ alleged victim, who is not named in the court documents, fled into Maryland, with McCarthy adding, “I don’t think they had a choice. He Had killed her.”

“This man was the most dangerous person I have ever dealt with in the court system,” McCarthy told the paper. “Because this man was smart. He was not stupid … he knew how to walk the line between frightening people and threats that could land him in prison.

“This man was the most dangerous person I have ever dealt with in the court system. Because this man was smart.”

– Brennan McCarthy, the lawyer who represented a former classmate of Jarrod Ramos

McCarthy told the USA Today newspaper that he, too, became a victim of Ramos’ anger, when he began harassing the lawyer of the sister and family. McCarthy constantly worried that Ramos would be able to come after one of his 19 nieces and nephews, the report said.

‘Most dangerous person I have ever dealt with’: Lawyer who represented his wife harassed by Capital Gazette murder suspect says he lived in fear https://t.co/zEIvvromne

— USA TODAY (@USATODAY) June 30, 2018

“It was a like a silent threat hang in there,” McCarthy said. “That’s even worse, because there is no mechanism of law to stop this man to do, something you just think he would do. The Capital was in the same boat. They knew how dangerous he is.”

In 2015, Ramos allegedly tweeted that he would like to see that the paper stop publishing, but “it would be more beautiful” to see two of its journalists “to stop breathing.”

But Ramos’ online resentment seemed to disappear for a while until the number of new messages appeared just before the murders.

Investigators were reviewing his social media posts and the search of his apartment.

A Twitter account believed to be is now suspended.

But one of the biggest unanswered questions is what Ramos after a two-year period of silence.

A transcript of a hearing in his reproach is revealed that Ramos was particularly troubled that the newspaper article reported he said: “f— you, leave me alone” to the woman who accused him of sexual harassment.

The woman said that she hadn’t written him in months.

“That carries a clear implication that there is something wrong in my head, that I am crazy,” Ramos told the judge.

Ramos sent the same message on the day of the shooting on a Twitter feed he checked.

“F— you, leave me alone,” he wrote.

On the day of the shooting, McCarthy was not shocked when he discovered the news.

“The moment I heard there was a shooting in the Capital, I told my wife, ‘That is Jarrod Ramos,'” McCarthy told the USA Today newspaper. “It did not surprise me in the least. The only question was where he would stop by first: My house or the office.”

“The moment I heard there was a shooting in the Capital, I told my wife, ‘That is Jarrod Ramos.'”

– Brennan McCarthy, the lawyer who represented a former classmate of Jarrod Ramos

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Amy’s Place is a news editor and reporter for Fox News.

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