News

Man died after police confrontation ruled accident

FILE – This photo provided by Prinice Thomas shows his cousin Tawon Boyd in the hospital after he was beaten and held to the ground by Baltimore County police after a confrontation outside his home on Sunday, Sept. 18, 2016. The Maryland medical examiner’s office said Boyd’s death after a violent struggle with the police was accidental and probably caused by the use of the drug. Boyd’s family’s attorney, A. Dwight Pettit said he you have an independent expert to review the autopsy and hospital records. (Prinice Thomas via AP, File)

(Associated Press)

BALTIMORE – A suburb of Baltimore man’s death days after a fierce battle with the police in September was accidental and probably caused by his drug use, the Maryland medical examiner’s office said in an autopsy report.

The report says Tawon Boyd, 21, died Sept. 21 after suffering multiple organ failure most likely caused by a poisoning of a drug known as “bath salts,” The Baltimore Sun (http://bsun.md/2iIyLvB ) Wednesday reported.

“It is unlikely that restraint by law enforcement caused or substantially contributed to his death on the basis of the reported circumstances and the timeline of the restraint,” the report said.

Boyd 911 and ended up wrestling with Baltimore County officers after banging his head against a neighbor’s door. The police reported that one of the five react officers struck Boyd twice in the face, as the young man held on him.

Boyd “appeared confused and paranoid,” police said. He died three days later.

An attorney for Boyd’s family, A. Dwight Pettit, said questions remain about Boyd’s medical care by first responders. Pettit said that he plans to an independent expert to review the autopsy report and Boyd’s hospital records.

“We think there is clearly something wrong here, beyond dispute, that anyone who calls for help ends up dead,” Pettit said.

The police said in the report that when she tried to talk to Boyd, he began to scream and tried to get in the police cars.

The autopsy report says emergency medical workers believed Boyd was in an “excited delirium state” and the administered anti-psychotic medication Haldol.

Boyd had calmed down, but then went into cardiac arrest, medical researchers said. He was revived by cardiopulmonary resuscitation and taken to a hospital, where he died.

___

Information from: The Baltimore Sun, http://www.baltimoresun.com

Follow us

Don't be shy, get in touch. We love meeting interesting people and making new friends.

Most popular