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Major solar storms will not hit Earth this week, NOAA says

File photo – NASA handout image shows the Sun acquired by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory on March 8, 2012.

(REUTERS/SOHO/NASA/handout)

Reports of a large solar storms that can wreak havoc on Earth this week are wide of the mark, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which is not observed significant storm-related activity on the Sun.

“It is very quiet,” Bob Rutledge, lead of operations for NOAA’s Space Weather Prediction Center, told Fox News. “There is no Sun spots like that now for the big solar storms you are going to a really big Sun spot region to the source of the eruption.”

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Solar, or geomagnetic storms are disturbances in the Earth’s magnetosphere, or the magnetic field caused by changes in the solar wind. The largest of these storms are associated with solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs), massive expulsion of plasma and magnetic field of the Sun, the corona, the outer atmosphere.

Reports in the Media of large geomagnetic storms hit the Earth on March 14, and this weekend have joined in the past few days. The most extreme storms can affect satellites and disrupt power grids on Earth.

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However, Rutledge told Fox News that he sees no reason for concern. “We have a number of very low level of G-1 storms predicted for later this week,” he said. “G-1 is the lowest of our geomagnetic storm scale – that comes with, often, no effect.”

Often, NOAA, eight, a dozen G-1 a storm in a month, according to Rutledge. G-5 is the highest level of geomagnetic activity, may disrupt spacecraft and satellite operations and is the cause of the power grid voltage control problems.

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Newsweek reports that the chatter about the impending large storms may be based on a wrong interpretation of a chart is placed by Russia’s Lebedev Institute.

Follow James Rogers on Twitter @jamesjrogers

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