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Kieskeurigheid in toddlers, according to researchers strongly genetically determined

Kieskeurigheid in toddlers, according to researchers strongly genetically determined

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Kieskeurigheid and not want to try new food in young children is partly in the genes.

Genes play a larger role in difficult eating behaviors than education, according to researchers from University College London. They analysed data of 1,921 families with twins, of sixteen months old.

The British sought the causes of two behaviors, which often go together: kieskeurigheid (very few kinds of food to eat) and voedselneofobie (no unknown food want to try).

The scientists found that abnormalities in kieskeurigheid as strongly influenced by genes as by the environment. At voedselneofobie was the influence of the genes is also large, but played the area much less. The researchers used a method called “quantitative genetic modeling’.

The precise results of the research are published in the scientific journal Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

Relief

Research leader Andrea Smith concludes that parents are not completely responsible have to feel for the difficult behaviors of their children.

“Our results are probably a great relief for parents who feel guilty about the kieskeurigheid of their children. The realization that this property is innate, this feeling of guilt to help reduce,” says Smith.

Smith emphasizes that the findings, parents are not relieved of all responsibility. Eating behaviors with good education or convertible.

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