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Kentucky lawmakers pass pension overhaul, despite teacher protests

The democratic state REP Rick Rand speaks against a bill to amend the state’s troubled pension system, March 29, 2018 in Frankfort, Ky.

(Associated Press)

Kentucky lawmakers passed a pension reform Thursday when he said it to Gov. Matt Bevin’s Desk, but also a reversal of the game asked about the speed of the passage, is reported.

The proposed pension overhaul benefits for most workers would receive, but do little to address the massive debt of the state.

The 291-page proposal came to a vote, suddenly, Thursday, takes the place of the sewage bill was on the docket.

The GOP-controlled house approved the bill, 49-46, and the Senate later, 22-15, as over 200 teachers and other opponents Shame on you” outside the chambers, the Louisville Courier-Journal reported chanting”.

Bevin defended the passage of the bill.

“Today, 49 members of the Kentucky house, and 22 members in the Senate of Kentucky, not elected, to hold, kicking tweeted the pension problem on the road,” the Governor, but it was not clear when he planned to sign it.

Today, 49 members of the Kentucky house, and 22 members in the Senate of Kentucky elected not to keep kicking the pension problem down the road

A person who receives a pension check in the coming years, a deep debt is owed the gratitude for these 71 men and women who have done the right thing

— Governor Matt Bevin (@GovMattBevin) 30. March 2018

The bill came so quickly that some lawmakers indicated that they knew how to do it financially on the state. Republicans-Rep. John “Bam” Carney told lawmakers expect the plan to save $300 million over the next 30 years. But Kentucky is at least $41 billion short of the money it needs to pay pensions over the same time.

“There was some hope that some of the things we could do, in the pension reform, could have a greater impact on the future of the liability, but at the end of the day, it was simply the will to do that,” Said House Speaker David Osborne said.

Morgan Taylor, a 28-year-old high-school-chemistry-teacher of Rockcastle County, told the Courier-Journal that lawmakers had had “clearly no time to read” the bill before the vote.

“As a teacher, I would never, never give my students something that I still read to self,” she said. “I think that a select group of people know what to expect in this (bill) and everyone else is just to walk the line.”

From 10:30 a.m. local time, the bill had not been posted, read online for the public, FOX 41 reported.

Democratic Rep. Tom Burch, reflects the passionate arguments among the teachers and officials, called the bill “garbage”, as he slammed it on the table during a flight Committee meeting on Thursday called.

“This law is found to be unconstitutional, the” democratic Republic of Derrick Graham said, according to FOX 41. “Remember this day. Let’s hear your voices, in November, for those who were with them in the loop and those who were against you.”

The bill removes some of the most reviled provisions of the previous proposals. Current and retired teachers who are not eligible for Social security benefits, would still be annual increases of 1.5 per cent in the rest receive their checks. Current workers would no longer work in order to qualify for the full effect.

Retired teacher Lydia Coffey chants of “Vote out”, the legislature in Kentucky debate a draft law on amendments to the state pension system, 29. March 2018, in Frankfort, Ky.

(Associated Press)

But new hires would be moved to a hybrid plan. They would all be guaranteed of the money that bore you and the taxpayers for their retirement accounts, plus 85 percent of the investment gains. The state would always have the other 15 percent.

The teacher told the Courier-Journal that the draft law would significantly reduce benefits for future teachers and they discourage young people from considering teaching as a career.

“How will you attract and keep good teachers in the state, if you have a pension?” Holbrook asked.

Almost immediately after the bill’s passage, announced, Fayette County Public Schools that the classes would be cancelled Friday.

After the pension bill vote, Fayette County Public Schools announced that it closed on Friday https://t.co/O9QcK4nzu8 pic.twitter.com/59RARiUNBY

— Courier-Journal (@courier journal) 30. March 2018

All Fayette County Public schools are closed on Friday, 30. March 2018 to result in more than a third of our school employees.

— Fayette County Public Schools (@FCPSKY) 30. March 2018

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Amy Lieu is a news editor and a reporter for Fox News.

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