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Is your iPhone spying on you? Here is what Apple told legislators

File photo: An Apple sales associate speaks with a customer to wait to purchase a new iPhone X in New York city, USA, November 3, 2017. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

Apple has assured US lawmakers that it is not spying on iPhone users. The company clams of third-party apps do not do so.

In July, the U.S. Committee for Energy and Commerce wrote letters to Apple CEO Tim Cook and Alphabet CEO Larry Page asking for clarification on how the consumer of the protection of the data is collected and shared.

“Just a few weeks ago, Apple announced changes in the App Store rules that were characterized as an attempt to restrict the amount of data third-party app developers can gather from Apple devices,” the letter reads. “These statements and actions raise questions about how Apple device users’ data is protected and when it is shared, and bundled.”

On Tuesday, Apple’s Director of Government Affairs, Timothy Powderly responded to that letter, in a 19-page document answering each question in detail.

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To concerns about microphone recording, he notes that users can give and revoke microphone access from third-party apps, and that included Siri interactions are linked to a random user-ID, instead of your Apple ID. Apple does not to a third-party developers, he adds.

Powderly emphasized that Apple values the privacy of consumers. He claims that consumer data is not central to Apple’s business model, and refers to the senators of Apple’s privacy web site. He does not deny, however, that Apple collects extensive information of the consumer.

For questions about the GPS, location information, he responds that users can turn location-based services on and off in their privacy settings. “Unlike other companies, Apple does not obtain a historical record of location data that is linked to a customer name or apple id for one of our services,” he writes. “Neither Apple used identifiable location information for targeted advertising.”

You can read the whole thing for yourself on Scribd.

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