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In the first world war pilot’s log book, and a gun, the camera, the photos were discovered in a barn

connectthe Video for’war to end all wars: How the first world War still resonates today

As the world marks the 100th anniversary of the armistice that ended the first world War, the National World War I Museum and Memorial will serve as a reminder of the sacrifices of the AMERICAN troops in The Great War.” Eric Shawn reports from Kansas City, Mo.

A log-book, and the gun camera photo’s that belonged to a world War I pilot, was found in an English garage.

The incredible artifacts that have been found in a field in the Leicestershire barn for decades, according to the british Auction house Hansons, who will be at the auction of objects of the following month.

The diary, which belonged to Lt. Airport to los angeles, described the crash landing, and the number of rounds fired by the aircraft, the Lewis gun, the bombs, and countermeasures against enemy aircraft. Other items that can be found are los angeles ‘ s aerial maps of the plane, pennant flags, and an officer in the Royal Flying Corps/RAF in the wings.

THE DIARY OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR HAS BEEN DISCOVERED IN A BARN, WHICH EXPLAINS THE BLOODY BATTLE OF THE SOMME

The log is from the month of November. 11, 1917, to Oct. 24, 1918, provides a look into the life of a pilot in the early days of air combat, according to Adrian Stevenson, head of the Auction house Hansons ‘ medals and militaria section. “All of the L. Leslie, documents, and records that are there,” he said in a statement. “We have to know what planes he flew, where he was trained, and the dangers he faced as he took to the skies to defend our country.”

A collection of first world War artifacts that belonged to Lt., Stuart Leslie, a pilot in the Royal Flying Corps, who was in the RAF. (Credit: Auction House Hansons)

As a second-lieutenant in the Royal Flying Corps, the forerunner of the RAF, Were in active service until October, 1918, and logged over 260 hours of flight time as a pilot and an observer.

“The collection is a fascinating one,” said Stevenson. “I was surprised to see the nine little reels of gun camera photos from 1918. The Gun cameras that were used during the training and the control of the test correctness. But the Pilot’s Flying Log Book, is very special. It is incredibly rare. I’ve only ever seen one in a museum.”

THESE ARE THE BULLET-SCARRED BIBLE SAVED THE LIFE OF A WORLD WAR II SOLDIER

The entries in the event log are “the plane is hit by machine-gun fire,” and “forced to due to an engine failure.” A badge can be found in the collection of the artifacts indicate that los angeles was wounded during his service.

The Pilot’s Flying Log Book belonging to Leslie.
(Credit: Auction House Hansons)

Leslie survived the war and died in 1950, at the age of 57. The collection came to light after a picture frame is made of a First World War aeroplane propeller, it was in the Hansons for the evaluation. “The owner told me he had more items relating to the war, and returned with a large box in Leicestershire, barn,” said Stevenson. “He didn’t have a clue who it is associated with, but told him that his mother was the recipient of the old family heirlooms. I was shocked when I started pulling out the items for you. It was a militaria sweetheart.”

Auctioneers Hansons, will auction off the items on the 20th of March. The entire collection, you can get $2,585, says it all.

IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR, AND HELMETS TO PROTECT AGAINST THE SHOCK OF WAVES, AND MODERN HELMETS, SCIENTISTS ARE DISCOVERING

A British soldier’s World War I diary all over the bloody Battle of the Somme, will also be auctioned off by Hansons, on the 20th of March.

The Gun camera photos are among the collection. (Credit: Auction House Hansons)

The diary was written in pencil by Pvt. Arthur Edward Diggens, of the Royal Engineers, will begin on Feb.13, 1916, and ending in October. 11 of that year. His diary entry for 1 July 1916, describes the first day of the Battle of the Somme.

The journal has a recommended price of $ 390 to $521.

IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR, SOLDIERS ARE COMING TO EUROPE TO FIGHT ALONGSIDE THE ALLIES IN RARE PHOTOS

Another notable world War I artifacts to have emerged in the past few years, such as the Bible, marked with a bullet from a German machine gun, which helped save the life of a British soldier.

The collection has been in a shed for decades to come. (Credit: Auction House Hansons)

By 2018, some rare photos have emerged of American troops arrive in Europe to fight alongside the allied forces during the first world War.

In the first world War, which was one of the bloodiest conflicts in modern history, and ended with the cease-fire came into effect at 11 a.m. local time on Nov. 11, 1918.

IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR PROPAGANDA POSTERS OFFER A UNIQUE GLIMPSE INTO THE SOLDIERS ‘ STORIES 100 YEARS AFTER THE CEASE-FIRE

Leslie’s, memorabilia and much more. (Credit: Auction House Hansons)

More than 700,000 British troops have been killed in the first world War, and nearly 1.7 million were injured, according to the British War Office for the information. Approximately 6 million British troops were deployed in the conflict.

More than 17 million people, military and civilian, lost their lives in the second world war. In the U. S in the war on 6 April 1917, lost more than 116,000 service members in the conflict.

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Leslie’s ‘wound stripe’, from which it appears that he was injured. (Credit: Auction House Hansons)

Researchers at Duke University recently revealed that, in the first world War the helmets perform very well against the shock wave in comparison with its state of the art, high-tech counterparts.

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