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In order to fight the opioid crisis, a Kentucky middle-school students to build a needle database to the aid of the 3D-printed collection device

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As a high school student in Kentucky has developed an online database to fill it with a needle, the parts of the device have been developed.

In May of last year, the middle school students from Ashland Middle School in Ashland, Ky., among the national winners in the Samsung Solve for Tomorrow contest. They won for the development of a device that allows clinicians to safely collect the potentially dangerous needles left behind by the opioid, and other drug use.

The device, itself, is 3D printed at school, was in a small plastic box, about the length of a needle and a few inches wide. The box is placed over the needle, and then squeezed to a pick-up from the spray.

KENTUCKY MIDDLE-SCHOOL STUDENTS, TO DESIGN 3D-PRINTED DEVICE TO HELP COMBAT THE OPIOID CRISIS

“We have an open order to you as soon as we are able to provide. Every police car in the city will be fitted with the device, as soon as we can get them [the police],” you know, John Leistner, as a teacher, when We are in the Middle of it, telling Fox News in an interview published on Thursday.

As a police officer with a prototype device that is designed for the safe picking up of the needles.
(Screenshot of the Samsung video)

The school is trying to come up with a cost-effective way for the fabrication of the device prototype, in the school’s 3D printer.

During the process of the development of the unit, the students have also created an online database where people can log where they used needles. The aim was to identify the areas where the needles are to be found.

GOOGLE TAPS TECH TO HELP YOU WITH THE BATTLE OF THE OPIOID CRISIS

“The Ashland Police Department has been on board with us in this project since Day 1,” Aubree, Hay, a student at Ashland High School, told Fox News.

On the left, to the right, and the students of Isaac Campbell, Caleb Campbell, and Aubree Hay of Ashland High School, will showcase their solution for Tomorrow’s last years in New York city.
(Samsung)

“We go out of our database for Our Department and the Police department. Right now they are updating the map as we speak,” she said.

“The database is simply a Google map with pins where the pins have been found. Now, [the police] actually have to enter the pins, where the pins are to be found in the area,” she added.

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