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Hurricane Florence’s powerful winds and the rain starts lashing Carolina coast, and residents urged to evacuate

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Outer bands of Hurricane Florence rock North Carolina coast

Griff Jenkins reports on the water surge in Atlantic Beach.

The first strong winds and rains from a weakened but still dangerous Hurricane Florence began lashing the North Carolina coast Thursday morning, when the sample is Category 2-barreled in for a prolonged and possibly catastrophic stay along the Mid-Atlantic region.

Florence wind was fallen from a peak of 140 km / h 105 mph late Thursday morning as authorities urged residents to remain alert about the broadening of the storm’s life-threatening storm surge, tropical storm force winds and catastrophic flooding.

Cameras outside the international space station captured new views of a somewhat weakened #HurricaneFlorence at 6:56 pm EDT Sept. 13 as it neared the U.S. east coast. According to the National Hurricane Center in Florence is moving to the northwest with gusts of up to 110 kilometers per hour. pic.twitter.com/vw2yxrhTmZ

— Intl. Space Station (@Space_Station) September 13, 2018

From 11 a.m. EDT, Florence was centered about 141 kilometers southeast of Wilmington, N. C., and about 195 miles from Myrtle Beach, S. C., and moving at about 10 km / h.

TRACK HURRICANE FLORENCE PATH HERE

FEMA Administrator Brock Lange, who was on Thursday briefing accidentally called the storm “Floyd” several times, a reference to 1999’s Hurricane Floyd, urged the residents in the danger zone to evacuate, saying the storm surge warnings have not changed, despite the weakening of the intensity of the wind scale.

“Please listen to the warnings,” he said. “Your time is running out.”

Whoa? #13NewsNow viewer says #HurricaneFlorence create storm-surge waters that are knee deep in spots.

This video made on Seabreeze Dr in the neighbourhood of Rodanthe, NC. Hold the SECURELY send your photos and vids with #13StormMode. pic.twitter.com/iXOcOaL4BE

— Steven Graves 13News Now (@13StevenGraves) September 13, 2018

David Novak, director of NOAA’s Weather Prediction Center, said the storm surge expected from Florence is “one of the deadliest hazards of hurricanes,” and forecasters predict up to a 13-meter rise in parts of the Carolina coast, including Cape Fear to Cape Lookout in North Carolina.

“If you’re in these areas, eastern North Carolina, eastern South Carolina, and has told you to evacuate,” Novak said. “Please do not think that you can drive. That would be a fatal decision.”

Forecasters said Florence eye could come ashore early Friday around the North Carolina, South Carolina line. Then it is likely to hover along the coast Saturday, pushing up to 13 feet of storm surge and discharge of water in both states.

The break of the Weather: Storm Surge now barrier Islands.#HurricaneFlorerence #ncwx @nwswilmington https://t.co/igFDpGdd8q

— Jeff Piotrowski (@Jeff_Piotrowski) September 13, 2018

HURRICANE FLORENCE STRENGTHENS IN THE ATLANTIC OCEAN: TIPS TO PREPARE FOR THE STORM

The forecast calls for as much as 40 inches of rain over seven days along the coast, with the deluge continuing, even if the center of the storm pushes its way across the Appalachian Mountains.

More than 5.25 million people live in areas under hurricane warnings or watches, and 4.9 million others live in places covered by tropical storm warnings or watches, the National Weather Service said.

“Do you want to be a hit with the train or do you want to hit with a cement truck?” said Jeff Byard, an administrator with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, talk about the difference between a life-threatening Category 3 hurricane and a still-deadly Category 2 storm.

HURRICANE FLORENCE CONTACTS TO BRANDS LIKE STORM HITS EAST COAST

Tornado watches are in effect in parts of southeast Virginia and eastern North Carolina. The tornado’s should be weak and short-life, but can add to the damage caused by precipitation, or in a straight line, or a hurricane.

Video

Americans from around the nation offering help to the Carolina

Jeff Masters, meteorology director of the forecasting website Weather Underground, said Florence finally could strike as a Category 1 with winds less than 100 mph — but that’s still enough to cause at least $ 1 billion in damages. Water kills more people in hurricanes than the wind and the rain and the storm surge is what Florence is extremely dangerous.

A life-threatening storm surge is expected of #Florence, especially along the coast of North Carolina between Cape Fear and Cape Lookout, including western Pamlico Sound and the Pamlico and Neuse Rivers. The Water quickly rises in these areas @NHC_Surge pic.twitter.com/wyxrp20CGJ

— National Hurricane Center (@NHC_Atlantic) September 13, 2018

President Trump touted the wants of the government for the storm on Friday and urged the residents to get to safety.

“We are fully ready for hurricane Florence, as the storm is still bigger and stronger,” he tweeted. “Be careful!”

HURRICANE FLORENCE, TO GENERATE THE 83-METRE-HIGH WAVES SUCH AS THE BARRELS IN THE DIRECTION OF THE CAROLINA COAST

It is unclear how many people have fled Florence, but until now, more than 1.7 million people in the Carolina and Virginia were warned to clear out. Airlines canceled nearly 1,000 flights and that number continued to climb Thursday.

Duke Energy, the nation’s No. 2 power company, said Florence could knock out electricity to three-quarters of its 4 million customers in the Carolinas, and outages could last for weeks. Workers are shipped in from the Midwest and Florida to help in the aftermath of the storm, it said.

Florence weakening as it approached the coast created tension between that house and agencies, which ensure that the storm could still be deadly.

AS HURRICANE FLORENCE APPROACHES, LIVE SURF CAM VIDEOS SHOW THE IMPACT ON THE CAROLINAS

Frustrated after evacuating his beach house for a storm that is now demoted, retired nurse Frederick Fisher grumbled in the lobby of a hotel in Wilmington, several miles in the interior.

“Against my better judgment, by emotion, I evacuated,” he said. “I have four cats in the house. If I don’t get back in a week, after a while they can at each other or trash the place.”

Fox News’ Amy Place, and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Lucia I. Suarez Sang a Reporter for FoxNews.com. Follow her on Twitter @luciasuarezsang

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