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Hurricane Florence recalls Carolina of Hugo, but also other large storms

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Hurricane Florence packing winds of up to 150 km / h

Fox News senior meteorologist Janice Dean gives update on the storm track.

As Hurricane Florence continues to walk in the direction of the Carolinas, which is in its path to think of other great storms that devastated the area and cost billions to the coastal towns.

As always, in the direction of the Carolina’s, Hurricane Florence is increased to a Category 4 storm with maximum sustained winds of about 140 km / h.

That distrustful look at Florence have in relation to Hurricanes Fran and Hugo, which ravaged North Carolina and South Carolina, respectively, more than two decades ago.

“It is not quite similar to that of Hugo, but it is the prediction of a major hurricane making landfall, so in that sense it will be like Hugo,” National Weather Service meteorologist Jake Wimberley told The Charlotte Observer.

Read on for a look at other major hurricanes that made landfall in North and South Carolina.

Hurricane Matthew; 2016

As the “most powerful storm of the 2016 Atlantic Hurricane of the Season” by the National Weather Service, Hurricane Matthew hit South Carolina on Oct. 8, 2016, in the neighborhood of McClellanville – located between Charleston and Myrtle Beach. Matthew hit South Carolina as a Category 1 storm and caused about $10.6 billion in damage – mostly due to flooding from Florida to North Carolina. The storm resulted in the deaths of 25 people in North Carolina and four in South Carolina, according to the National Hurricane Center.

More about this…

  • Hurricane Florence path: the Track of the storm here

  • What is the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale?

  • A long history of hurricanes in the Florida Keys

  • Tips to prepare for Hurricane Florence

Once a powerful Category 5 hurricane, Matthew had weakened by the time it hit South Carolina. However, wind gusts were still included if the high of 87 km / h on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina.

Hurricane Irene; 2011

When it made landfall near Cape Lookout, North Carolina, on Aug. 27, 2011, Hurricane Irene was considered a strong Category 1 storm. Wind gusts were recorded as high as 115 miles per hour on Carteret County, North Carolina, during the storm, according to the National Weather Service.

Overall, five people died in North Carolina before the storm. It cost about $15.4 billion in damage as it traveled the east coast of the United States.

Hurricane Isabel; 2003

Hurricane Isabel had transformed from a Category 5 to a Category 2 storm when it made landfall on the Ocracoke Inlet in North Carolina on Sept. 18, 2003.

The National Weather Service noted Isabel impressive gusts of wind, which made tropical cyclones in some areas. Wind gusts were recorded as strong as 310 km / h in Pender County, North Carolina.

Hurricane Floyd In 1999

As a Category 2 hurricane, Hurricane Floyd made landfall at Cape Fear, North Carolina, on Sept. 16, 1999. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 110 mph and brought massive storm surges, according to the National Weather Service.

Overall, Floyd costs $9.9 billion in damages as a result of floods in various states along the East Coast – but particularly in North Carolina.

In North Carolina, 35 people have died – mostly due to drowning in the floods that have taken place. In all, Hurricane Floyd was responsible for 57 deaths in the united states and the Grand Bahama Island.

Hurricane Bonnie; 1998

Hurricane Bonnie was a Category 2 storm when it made landfall on August 26, 1998 near Wilmington, North Carolina, according to the National Weather Service.

Bonnie was responsible for three deaths, including a 12-year-old girl was killed when a tree fell in her house, The Washington Post reported at the time. General, Bonnie will cost about $1.5 billion in damage as it destroyed North Carolina and Virginia.

Hurricane Fran; 1996

One of the most powerful hurricanes to hit North Carolina, Fran was a Category 3 storm when it made landfall around Cape Fear, North Carolina, on Sept. 5, 1996. During North Carolina bore the brunt of the destruction from the storm the size of Fran brought damage as far inland as Ohio, according to the National Weather Service.

Fran caused about $7.2 billion in damages at the time and was responsible for the death of 24 people in North Carolina, The News & Observer reported.

Hurricane Bertha; 1996

A Category 2 hurricane, Hurricane Bertha made landfall near Cape Fear, North Carolina on July 12, 1996. General, Bertha was responsible for 12 deaths, according to the National Weather Service.

Hurricane Hugo; 1989

One of the most powerful hurricanes ever seen South Carolina, Hugo made landfall on Sept. 22, 1989, in the neighborhood of Sullivan’s Island, South Carolina as a Category 4 storm.

Hugo brought tremendous winds, leveling homes and businesses, tearing down trees and making roads impassable as it hit near Charleston. Generally caused $18.7 billion in damage as it wreaked havoc on the Carolina’s in particular.

Hugo was blamed for at least 86 dead, according to the National Weather Service.

Hurricane Gracie; 1959

When the loop through the St. Helena Sound in South Carolina on Sept. 29, 1959, Hurricane Gracie was a Category 4 hurricane, according to the National Weather Service.

While the storm in 1959, it was only designated a Category 4 storm by the scientists, in 2016, The Associated Press reported.

Gracie is the cause of death of 10 people in South Carolina and spent about $14 million in damages, according to The Associated Press.

Hurricane Hazel; 1954

Hurricane Hazel made landfall on the North and South Carolina border on Oct. 15, 1954, according to the National Weather Service. Then, Hazel was a strong Category 4 hurricane with wind speeds up to 150 km / h, which huge destruction.

A first report said that “all traces of civilization right on the waterfront between the border and Cape Fear were practically destroyed,” according to the National Weather Service. In addition, there are only five of the 357 buildings in Long Beach, North Carolina, is said to have remained after the storm.

Kaitlyn Schallhorn is a Reporter for Fox News. Follow her on Twitter: @K_Schallhorn.

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