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How can a space change the human body

Astronaut Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper waves at the camera during a space walk.
(NASA)

In order to travel in the area is sure to be a perilous journey into the unknown. Prepare to walk into an environment, the absence of the force of gravity, and the essential tools for survival, it is not an easy task, as NASA can attest.

In the course of its business, in the area is severe, and it can have serious side effects. If it is exposed to radiation, or engaging in any intense physical activity, and to mitigate the effects of space on their bodies, astronauts will certainly put their bodies on the line to traverse the universe beyond our planet.

In fact, when it comes to the time spent away from the pull of gravity, and a challenging exercise regimen, it is just the tip of the iceberg. Here are just five of the ways a space can make a difference, in the human body.

In Japan, astronaut Norishige Kanai has traveled to the International Space Station on Dec. 19, 2016.
(Ap)

Can astronauts grow in space?

Jaws dropped when the Japanese astronaut Norishige Kanai, announced on Twitter that he has grown 3.5 inches in the span of just three weeks, while on-board the International Space Station (ISS).

“Today, I am sharing some serious news. Since his arrival to the area, I have grown 9 inches in diameter. It is best grown in the three weeks since the primary and secondary levels. I’m a little worried that I would not fit in my seat on the return journey, on a Mission,” Kanai tweeted, referring to the Russian Soyuz TMA spacecraft that transports crew to and from the ISS.

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A day later, Kanai apologized for the spreading of “false news,” stated that he took the test. He had actually grown to be 0.9 cm, which is 2.6 inches, less than originally requested.

Astronauts can grow up to 3 percent taller during the trip into space, NASA scientists say. This is because there is less gravity pushing down on the vertebrae in the spinal column. As a result, the vertebrae, from the body, allowing the body to stretch up to 2 inches in diameter.

The majority of the growth that occurs when a spacecraft goes into orbit, according to NASA. The astronauts will still be a gradual change over time, but for the relaxation of your spine and eventually comes to a stop.

If astronauts stayed in space forever, they would not have continued to grow and grow, Dr. Sudhakar Rajulu, an engineering manager at NASA, said in a statement online.

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In fact, the growth rate is only temporary.

Astronauts’ spines will return to its normal curvature as soon as they get back to Earth. They are usually returned to their pre-flight, within 10 working days.

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly, it was about 2 inches taller when he returned to Earth after a 340-day stay on the ISS in March 2016. However, as predicted, Kelly is the height gain was only temporary. The astronaut’s twin brother, former astronaut Mark Kelly, told CNN that his brother, took less than two days to get back to his normal height.

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly speaks of a one-year mission in space

Casey stegall reports from Houston

What happens to the bones of the astronauts?

It’s common for the astronauts to gradually lose muscle strength and bone mineral density, while long-duration space flights. Studies of astronauts who spent a few months in the Mir, a Russian space station that operated in low orbit around the Earth from 1986 until 2001, it was found that the space explorers are able to lose, on average, 1 to 2 percent of bone mass per month.

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“The magnitude of this effect has led NASA to consider bone loss an inherent risk of extended space flights,” Dr. Jay Shapiro, team lead for bone studies at the National Space Biomedical Research Institute, said in an online statement.

This environment is likely to be the cause of bone loss in the area.

If you live in a gravity-free zone, the bone does not have in order to fight against the gravitational pull of the Earth, in order to provide support for locomotion or for the maintenance of the posture of the body, from NASA, explains. Therefore, there is little mechanical stress on the body, which results in a progressive loss of bone.

A view from the International Space Station (ISS).
(AP/NASA)

Are the astronauts’ eyes from being affected by the environment?

It is true that More than half of American astronauts have had the same experience with a vision for change, and the changes in the components of their eyes both during and after the long flight.

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NASA researchers believe that the headward fluid shift that occurs in the course of the flights, leading to an increased pressure in the brain, and what can be done with a push on the back of the eye, causing it to change shape.

In addition, the transition from one gravity field to another, it can have an influence on body functions, including spatial orientation, as well as head-eye and hand-eye co-ordination, as per NASA.

Why do the astronauts get blown out in the space.

Astronauts have to be able to feel perfectly healthy when they launch into space, but this feeling does not last long. When astronauts travel in space, they feel as if they have a cold, and their faces are starting to look for swollen.

This is because the fluid in their body to divide, to distribute through the whole body, as they will be moving to a microgravity environment.

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The body registers this shift as an increase in blood volume, NASA has said. It is due to the elimination of what he thinks are extra fluids through your kidneys. As soon as the fluid has been flushed out of the body of the astronauts will have to adapt to the new distribution of fluids, and are beginning to feel (and look) normal again.

Do astronauts sleep in space?

Well, the short answer is “no”.

Insomnia is a common complaint among astronauts. Studies have shown that astronauts tend to sleep an average of six hours a night.

Changes in the biological clocks, or circadian rhythms that contribute to a sleep deficiency. And the fact that the astronauts experience a sunrise or a sunset every 45 minutes as they circle the Earth in a course will not help you.

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“You can also develop sleep disorder because of your circadian rhythm can be thrown off due to the 38 additional minutes per day in march, or by a small, noisy environments, or the stresses of long term isolation and confinement,” which may also lead to depression, ” says NASA.

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“The rapid change in the schedule is an issue, but the fact is, the exposure light at the time that the astronauts are scheduled to go to sleep,” Erin Flynn-Evans, a researcher at the Fatigue Countermeasures Lab in Ames, as described in the 2016 survey. “The members of the crew will be looking out the dome window, and a picture of the Earth during their scheduled sleep time, which will allow them to get acquainted with a bright burst of sunlight and inhibit their ability to go to sleep.”

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