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Houston police demolition no-knock warrants for undercover raids

Houston Police Department Chief Art Acevedo said officers needed to receive a special exemption from the office to conduct a no-knock raid. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

Officers in Houston will now need to request a special exemption from the police chief’s office to perform a no-knock raid, according to reports.

Officials also announced a new policy for undercover officers to wear body cameras on raids.

The change in policy following a drug raid on a home that is in a deadly shooting, in which two suspects were killed and five undercover officers were injured, the head of the police said.

“The no-knock warrants are going to go away, such as leaded petrol in this city,” Chief Art Acevedo announced during a town hall meeting on Monday.

The decision comes as the city faces the criticism of the local community activists for the Jan. 28 raid that led to the death of a 59-year-old Dennis Tuttle and a 58-year-old Rhogena Nicholas, who lived in the house. Four officers were shot in the firefight and the other was injured but not shot.

Rhogena Nicholas, 58, and Dennis Tuttle, 59, were identified as the suspects. (Houston Police Department)

5 UNDERCOVER COPS INJURED IN THE HOUSTON RAID, 2 SUSPECTS DEAD, OFFICIALS SAY

Acevedo said last month that a team of nine narcotics officers attempted to get a search warrant and “immediately came under fire” at the door of a house in the centre of the south-eastern side.

He said that a large pit bull charged at the first officer through the door, who shot and killed the dog. Acevedo said Tuttle opened fire, striking the officer in the shoulder.

The shooting broke out as members of the Houston police narcotics unit responded to a house they suspected was a hub for the dealing of drugs, in particular the sale of ‘street-level narcotics”, such as “black tar heroin,” Acevedo said.

The officials had no heroin, but recovered marijuana, an unknown white powder and two guns, he said.

HOUSTON POLICE UNION WARNING FOR ‘DIRTBAGS TRYING TO MAKE OUR LIVES’ AFTER SHOOTING

Acevedo proved last week that an investigation into the drug raid found a 30-year veteran of the force lied in a sworn statement to justify the storming of the house without warning. Officer Gerald Goines, who prepared the search warrant, has since been suspended and it is unclear what charges he could face.

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Fox News’ Kathleen Joyce and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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