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High-tech clothes you can use in the electronics and defence against germs

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Your shirt will soon be able to turn on the lights and the music, in addition to wicking away the bacteria and sweat.

Researchers from Purdue University and a fabric of innovation that makes it possible for the wearers to control electronic devices with your clothing.

According to the researchers, the water-proof, anti-microbial, and breathable material that is based on the “omniphobic tribolectic nanogenerators — that is, to make use of the embroidery, and the fluorinated molecules to the inclusion of small electronic components, and in turn the dress into a remote control for other electronic devices.

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“This is the first time that there is a technique that is able to transform it to an existing canvas item of clothing in a self-powered, e-textiles, sensors, music players, or simply enlightenment, with the help of the easy to embroider, without the need for expensive fabrication processes, which are complex and costly equipment,” Ramses Martinez, an assistant professor in the School of Industrial Engineering, said in a press release.

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The researchers are looking for partners to test and possibly commercialize the technology.

“But it’s fashion has changed considerably over the last few centuries, and can easily be adopted to a newly-developed high-performance materials, there have been quite a few examples of the clothing available on the market that interact with the user,” Martinez explained. “It will have an interface with a machine, which is a constant, we are to bear one sounds like the most practical approach is to have a continuous communication with the machines, and the Internet of Things.”

Their work has been published in Advanced Functional Materials.

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