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Hackers can be bit more throughout the towns and cities, with the help of the connected car, investigators say

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Imagine a future in which they will take you on a self-propelled vehicle, and, all of a sudden shuts down in the middle of a large New York City mansion.

When you open the box to see what is going on, it seems like every other self-driving cars in the area has shut down, grinding traffic to a halt across the city.

While that scenario may sound far-fetched right now, in a new study, scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology (mit), and Multiscale Systems, Inc. have to simulate what it would take for a hacker to wreak this kind of havoc in the future will be even more connected to the world.

The study found that even random boarding is only 20 per cent of the cars during rush hour would be away from all the traffic to a standstill in a place like new york city.

However, in the other cities and towns that don’t have Manhattan’s famous grid layout, it would most likely be hit even harder by this kind of hack.

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“The Manhattan has a beautiful grid, which makes movement more efficient. On the lookout for towns and cities without large grids (like Atlanta, Boston, Los Angeles, california, and we believe that hackers will be able to do even worse evil, because it is a grid and you create more robust, with redundancies, to get to the same places, have many different routes, Peter Yunker, who co-led the study and is an assistant professor in Georgia Tech’s School of Physics said in a press release.

Most of the discussion about self-driving cars and safety about hacks that could cause a car to cause a car to hit a pedestrian. The researchers would like to change the story.

“In contrast to the majority of the data breaches we hear about hacked cars, and have physical consequences,” Yunker added.

The Waymo driverless car is displayed at a Google event in San Francisco, california. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Although the researchers are not cyber security experts, and they hope that their work will be asked of experts and government officials to think about the future of the connected car, and what kind of attack might be stopped or much less likely.

To the researchers, the results of which were published in the journal Physical Review E.

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