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‘Great dragon’ dinosaur discovered in China

An artistic display of Lingwulong shenqi, a newly discovered dinosaur unearthed in northwestern China, it seems in this picture July 24, 2018.

(Reuters)

Paleontologists in China discovered a new kind of dinosaur that by the planet, millions of years ago.

The fossil, found in the northwest of China ‘ s Lingwu region, got the name of Lingwulong shenqi, which translates to “Lingwu great dragon.”

The discovery was announced Tuesday, and may force researchers to rethink the entire board of the largest animals to roam the earth.

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Lingwulong shenqi, a member of the plant-eating dinosaurs known as a whole, lived 174 million years ago during the Jurassic period.

Two technicians from the measurement of a large in situ shoulder bone of Lingwulong shenqi, a newly discovered dinosaur unearthed in northwestern China, it seems in this picture July 24, 2018.

(Reuters)

The scientists unearthed bones from at least eight to 10 Lingwulong persons, the largest of which was about 57 metres long, paleontologist Xing Xu of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, who led the study published in the journal Nature Communications, told Reuters.

The researchers told the wire service the discovery pushes with 15 million years of the appearance of the so-called advanced developed, including some of the largest land animals ever.

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“In the past, we thought all these advanced sauropods is formed around 160 million years ago and quickly diversified and spread across the planet in a time perhaps as short as 5 million years,” said University College London paleontologist Paul Upchurch, a study co-author.

But the discovery of Lingwulong means that this group emerged a little earlier and more slowly, he added.

Lingwulong lived in a warm, wet area with lush vegetation. Its neck was shorter than some of the other species, and could be grazed on soft plants with the peg-like teeth.

“Our discoveries indicate that east Asia was still attached to other continents at the time,” Xu said.

Christopher Carbone is a reporter and news editor covering science and technology for FoxNews.com. He can be reached at christopher.carbone@foxnews.com. Follow him on Twitter @christocarbone.

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