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Florida woman catches 10-foot alligator ‘stomping’ on her front door: ‘when I ran’

connectVideo9-foot alligator traps family in home

A 350-pound gator greets an unsuspecting Florida woman at her front door Tuesday morning, causing panic homeowner to flee.

When Geri Staples, heard the harsh knocking, she peeked out of a bright window in her door to see who or what, rather — was the cause of the ruckus. To her surprise, an estimated 10-foot long alligator was on the other side, and it seemed to be frustrated.

“I saw him there, and he slammed the door, and then I walked [over]. I was not sure if he kept pounding as if he could actually open the door with his snout if he hit hard enough. So I took no risk, of Staples, who lives in Merritt Island, told WESH.

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Neighbours on the other side of the street watched the bizarre scene unfold.

“That is the biggest gator that is here in the last 20 years that we’ve seen,” neighbor Corey Larkam told WKMG-TV.

According to the news station, neighbors said the massive gator was spotted during a walk through the neighborhood earlier that day. Neighbors’ attempts to wrangle the gator and remove them from the property were not successful, so they called the local wildlife officials for back-up.

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Wildlife officials told WESH the gator up to 60 years old. A trapper allegedly shot and killed the gator after a fierce battle.

“I’m just glad they took him away, so I don’t have to worry about him anymore,” Staples added.

Alligators start to become more active as the temperature rises. Therefore, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) warns Floridians to stay alert.

“[The Gators] are more visible and active in the spring,” Tammy Sapp, spokeswoman for the Florida Wildlife Commission’s Statewide Nuisance Alligator Program (SNAP), previously told Fox News. “Their metabolism increases and they start looking for prey.”

Snapp advised to keep a safe distance from the gators.

Anyone who is of the opinion that an alligator is that a “threat to people, pets or property” should call the FWC’s toll-free hotline at 866-FWC-GATOR, Snapp said.

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