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Farmers ‘ markets a racially biased cause of ‘the environment ‘gentrification’,’ professors say

(Reuters)

Two California professors are critical to farmers ‘ markets for the cause of “environmental gentrification” in which “habits of white people are normal.”

San Diego State University geography professors Pascale Joassart-Marcelli and Fernando J. Bosco argue that farmers ‘ markets are “white spaces” the suppression of minorities in a chapter on “Green Enough”, an environmental anthology with a focus on urban development.

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Environmental gentrification is defined as a process of ‘improvement of the environment lead to the displacement of long-term residents”, says the anthology.

(iStock)

The professors, as reported by Campus Reform, say the farmers’ markets are “exclusion” because the local population cannot afford the food and/or feel excluded from this new space.”

The SDSU faculty, who teach classes like “Geography of Food” and “Food Justice”, claiming that “the farmers’ markets are often white spaces where the food consumption habits of the white people are normal.”

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Although such markets are typically set up to help in the fight against “food deserts” in low-income and ethnic minorities, for the scientists who claim that they are in place of “attracting households from the higher socio-economic backgrounds, the increase of property values and the move of low-income residents and people of color.”

“The most insidious part of this gentrification process is that alternative food initiatives work against the activists of the community and residents for the first time used to fight environmental injustice and to provide these facilities, but have considerably less political and economic influence developers and real estate professionals,” the professors argue.

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They claim that while “curbing gentrification is a tedious task,” the negative externalities of the “white habitus” is formed at farmers ‘ markets can be managed by means of the “slow and including the steps that balance of new initiatives and the near stability of the cities ‘just green enough.'”

Joassart-Marcelli and Bosco received a grant from the National Science Foundation to study the role of nutrition in the structuring of the daily life in immigrant and low-income urban neighborhoods.”

Caleb Parke is an associate editor for FoxNews.com. You can follow him on Twitter @calebparke

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