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‘Extraordinary’ waves of Jupiter’s moon Ganymede, spotted

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Intense electromagnetic waves emanating from Jupiter’s moon Ganymede

Scientists have spotted ‘extraordinary,’ intense waves coming from Jupiter’s moon, Ganymede. The ‘chorus ‘ waves’ are a million times more powerful than they are on Earth, and can have disastrous consequences for a spacecraft.

Scientists have observed “extraordinary” waves coming from Jupiter’s moon, Ganymede.

The electromagnetic waves, also known as “chorus waves,” were spotted by the Galileo Probe spacecraft, which has a mission of surveying the Jupiter-wave environment.

“It is a very strange and puzzling phenomenon to show that a moon with a magnetic field can create a huge intensification in the force of the waves,” Yuri Shprits, the lead author of the study, told the Independent.

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The British publication reports that the waves appear to be partly caused by Jupiter’s intense magnetic field, that is the solar system of the strongest.

One of Jupiter’s moons, Ganymede, is shown above.

(NOAA)

Jupiter’s moon Ganymede has long fascinated astronomers as it is the largest of the planet’s moons, even larger than the planet Mercury, and is supposed to have an interior ocean.

Chorus waves are detected in the space around the Earth, but they are not as strong as the waves on Jupiter,” Richard Horne of the British Antarctic Survey, a co-author of the study, told the Independent.

Ganymede has long fascinated astronomers because it is the largest of Jupiter with many moons, even larger than the planet Mercury, and is supposed to have an interior ocean.

“Even if a small portion of these waves from the immediate vicinity of Ganymede, they will be able to speed up particles to very high energies and, ultimately, producing very rapid electrons in Jupiter’s magnetic field,” Horne added.

Christopher Carbone is a reporter and news editor covering science and technology for FoxNews.com. He can be reached at christopher.carbone@foxnews.com. Follow him on Twitter @christocarbone.

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