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Ex-mafia boss who ratted out Mafia heavyweights of the death in a witness protection

Alfonse “Little Al” D’arco, seen here in an FBI surveillance photo, death in for the protection of witnesses of complications of kidney disease.

The one-time head of the Luchese crime family whose testimony brought many of New York City’s Mafia heavyweights reportedly died earlier this month from complications of the disease of the kidney.

Alfonse “Little Al” D’arco, who was the first of his generation flip sides to spill the mob’s most valuable secrets of the fbi, has died at the age of 89, while in the protection of witnesses, Ganglandnews.com reported.

D’arco’s testimony in more than a dozen studies have brought the likes of “Mafia Cops” Stephen Caracappa and Louie Ippolito; Genovese family boss Vincent “The Chin” Gigante; Colombo boss “Little Vic” Orena; ex-Luchese guard Vic Amuso and Anthony “Gaspipe” Casso; Bonanno consigliere Anthony Spero.

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A native of Brooklyn, D’arco was born and raised a few blocks from the Navy Yard, is a hub of the underworld hustlers. His youth was “like being in the forest, and all the trees were the dons and the organized crime boys,” the gangster called once.

The Korean war veteran back to his roots and together with the future Luchese family head Amuso in 1959.

According to an in memoriam, D’arco became a capo after Luchese informant Henry Hill’s testimony led to the conviction of Paulie Vario, in 1984, as later described in detail in the mob classic “GoodFellas.”

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D’arco, he was promoted to acting boss in January 1991, when Amuso and incorporates Casso screwed on to prevent the arrest. Within eight months at the top, D’arco was allegedly convinced that his old gang friends were setting him up for murder.

So he turned sides and became an FBI informant – not to avoid prosecution, but because his lifelong faith in the Mafia and the code of honour was gone

He has reportedly told prosecutors that his shift from gangster to witness was just another phase of his life.

“I’m still a gangster,” he told the prosecutor, according to Ganglandnews.com. “But I’m an outlaw, that’s all. It’s not like they throw you out of the mob if you the flip. You’re just considered an outlaw. That is what I am.”

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D’arco was sentenced to time served and a fine of $50 in November 2002 in exchange for his testimony.

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