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Drought threatens the wild horses that are a symbol of the west

connectVideoWild horses help in severe drought

Non-profit started with the feeding program for the wild horses, as drought directly affected enter.

FOUNTAIN HILLS, ARIZONA – For centuries, the wild horses are a western icon, free roaming open pastures in the states of Montana, Wyoming and Arizona.

But due to a recent drought, their usually green picturesque meadows changed into a dry, brown, parched ground, causing thousands of wild horses with scarce food and water.

An attempt to save them, however, was not without some controversy.

A non-profit group, Arizona’s Salt River Wild Horse Management Group, started with an emergency feed program where they have the daily power stations, so that the horses could eat and drink.

For centuries, the wild horses are a western icon, free roaming open pastures in the states of Montana, Wyoming and Arizona.
(Fox News)

“It is simply a human management factor, we do not want the horses here to the hungry,” said Cindy Smith, a horse volunteer. “So, the lack of rain has not the production of the feed on the ground, the natural habitat for the horses to feed and so it was imperative that we take the step from a human perspective, and bring them back to good health. They would have starved.”

The members of the horse and the management of the group said as she stepped in, a few of the horses die.

“We had mares (mares) that were in very bad condition, which is actually very close to death, and we have two of them here at our facility that we needed to save, because they were so sick,” said Simone Netherlands, Salt River Wild Horse Management Group president.

But these power supplies are not supported by everyone. The federal government Bureau of Land Management has a Wild Horse and Burro Program, that the management of wild horses and burros on 26.9 million acres of public lands across 10 western states.

Gus Warr, wild horse and bureau specialist for the Bureau of Land Management, said though the agency praises the work of non-profit organizations and wants to work with them, he is worried about people feeding the animals, because it makes of the wild horses, depending on the people.

“As an agency, we do not supplementary feed wild horses or burros,” he said.

The group that helped the wild horses, said many were close to death and had to be rescued because they were so sick.
(Fox News)

Michael Schoon, a professor at the Arizona State University School of Sustainability, said: there are other ways to keep the animals alive.

“People are busy with additional power supplies and this kind of things because they’re too wild and we want them wild,” said Clean. “They are a symbol of the American West and the pioneering spirit, and with all this we want to recognize these horses for the symbol that they are, as well.”

He said that they water is one thing, but to give them food, can also the animals in danger.

But the members of the wild horse management of the group thought that there is no other alternative.

In Arizona this year, in many areas of the state experienced a long period of time with little to no rain. Over a period of several weeks, 100% of Arizona was in some form of drought. That left much of the land where the horses roam barren.

In Arizona this year, in many areas of the state experienced a long period of time with little to no rain. Over a period of several weeks, 100% of Arizona was in some form of drought. That left much of the land where the horses roam barren.
(Fox News)

The non-profit used an app to record and track hundreds of the wild horses in the tonto National forest.

“We are working together with the Ministry of (Agriculture) with Arizona and started a feed program, where we were almost every evening, in the first instance and just monitor the horses’ health and we are continuously working with the management of the horses and the monitoring of the health,” Smith said.

The group was able to scale the amount of supplies in the winter, and this month stopped with the power supplies by more precipitation and more forage on the ground. The group spent $76,000 on the feed program—the most it had ever spent.

The wild horse population has grown rapidly in the past few years, so the group has also worked to get the numbers under control by what they call a humane birth control program.

“…The program, we can ensure that the flock is to be humanely managed, and that the population numbers go down a little bit, and that is what the government wants,” Netherlands said. “Back in 2015, that they were in danger of roundup and removal, and we are proud that today these horses are protected, and that we treat them humanely.”

There are a lot of efforts to the American West, the symbol of life, and under control, but many say that it is important to keep them wild.

“I think I, like most people, the love of these horses,” Clean said, ” and you want to see them healthy and prosperous.”

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